Exciting Developments at The Center for Eating Disorders’ Intensive Outpatient Program

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An Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for eating disorders can be important for individuals who are transitioning out of an inpatient or partial hospital setting but would still benefit from more support and structure than is typically offered through weekly outpatient therapy.  The Center for Eating Disorders’  IOP provides 16 hours per week of intensive treatment in the evenings to allow individuals to fully engage in school, work and family during the day while continuing to focus on their recovery.

In the past six months, the IOP has seen some exciting changes and updates in programming. The program has returned to (a newly renovated!) space on the ground floor of the Sheppard Pratt B building, just downstairs from the inpatient and partial hospital units. Our multidisciplinary treatment team now includes members from psychiatry, psychology, art therapy, nutrition, occupational therapy, and social work.

Some of the recent exciting additions to IOP include:

  • Medical DirectorHeather Goff, MD has stepped into the role of Medical Director for the IOP, leading the multidisciplinary treatment team in providing care for patients. She also provides psychiatric treatment to all patients, including weekly assessments and medication management.
  • Clinical CoordinatorMorgan Krumeich, PsyD joined the IOP team in 2014 as our new clinical coordinator. She also leads group therapy and works with patients on an individual basis.
  • Collaborative Care Group – IOP now offers a weekly collaborative care group for parents, caregivers, and supports. Run by IOP social worker Annie Hanley, this group is similar to those offered at other levels of care, but is tailored specifically to the needs and issues that may arise during IOP treatment and associated transitions. All support persons are highly encouraged to attend this free weekly group, held on Tuesdays from 6:30PM-7:30PM.
  • Occupational Therapy – Occupational therapist Rachel Dehart has joined the IOP team and runs weekly OT groups for adults. Adolescents also have the opportunity to meet with an occupational therapist as needed. OT groups in IOP focus on the unique needs of individuals with eating disorders, including time management, grocery shopping, clothes shopping, involvement in the community, work or volunteering, and school.
  • Individualized Nutrition Consultations – With two dietitians now on the IOP team, Caitlin Royster and Kelly Daugherty, we continue to offer weekly nutrition groups for all patients. Additionally, dietitians are working to provide individual assessments and nutrition consultation for patients on a weekly basis.

The Intensive Outpatient Program is designed to work closely with individuals, their families, and outpatient providers in order to offer the most comprehensive care possible. And of course, we always work to incorporate patient feedback in order to ensure the IOP is continuously developing and meeting the needs of individuals, families and the community.

If you have questions about the Intensive Outpatient Program, please call (410) 938-5252 or email EatingDisorderInfo@sheppardpratt.org.

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Meet the IOP Staff

Heather Goff, M.D.
Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist
Medical Director, Intensive Outpatient Program
Dr. Goff joined the Center for Eating Disorders in 2011. A child and adolescent psychiatrist, she is board-certified in both Adult Psychiatry and Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, providing her a developmental perspective that enhances her work with patients of all ages. Her initial medical training was at New York Medical College, followed by a residency in Adult Psychiatry at Yale University, where she was a chief resident in 2005-2006. She then went on to complete a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center, where she was again chosen to be a chief resident in 2007-2008. Upon completion of her post-graduate training, Dr. Goff joined the Yale faculty, with joint appointments in the Department of Psychiatry and the Child Study Center. As a clinician-educator, she was the teaching attending for one of the adolescent inpatient units. She also served as Director of the Child Study Center at Madison, where she provided direct outpatient care to children, adolescents and their families. While at Yale, Dr. Goff was also a fellow at the Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Public Policy, leading to her interest in the intersection of the media and social policy in the development and treatment of eating disorders. In her role at CED, Dr. Goff spent one year treating individuals in the inpatient and the partial hospital programs. In 2012, she transitioned to a new role as Medical Director of the Center’s Intensive Outpatient Program and is also completing assessments and evaluations for children and adolescents in our outpatient department.

Erin Birely, LGPC
Mental Health Counselor
Erin Birely graduated from Loyola University in Maryland in 2012 with a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology. She completed a year of internship at the Center for Eating Disorders from 2011-2012, and subsequently began working full time in 2012. She is currently working towards her LCPC certification. Erin provides individual check ins and goal setting with patients. Additionally she facilitates DBT groups focusing on symptom management and emotion regulation, and IPT groups focusing on processing interpersonal difficulties, as well as leading the Multi-Family and Supports Group on Wednesdays.

Kelly Daugherty, RD, LDN
Clinical Dietitian
Kelly Daugherty received her Bachelor of Science degree in Dietetics from Saint Catherine University in Minnesota. She completed her dietetic internship with an emphasis in clinical nutrition at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, MD. During this internship, Kelly completed rotations on an acute care eating disorder unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and at the Center for Eating Disorders. Kelly joined the CED team in November 2014. She completes nutrition assessments, teaches nutrition groups and assists patients with menu planning in the inpatient, partial hospital, and intensive outpatient programs.

Caitlin Royster, RD, LDN
Clinical Dietitian
Caitlin Royster received her Bachelors of Science in Nutritional Sciences with a concentration in Dietetics from Cornell University. She completed her dietetic internship with a focus on clinical nutrition and nutrition research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. Caitlin joined the Center for Eating Disorders in July 2014. Here she conducts nutrition assessments, teaches nutrition groups, and assists patients with meal planning in the inpatient, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient programs. Prior to joining the Center for Eating Disorders, Caitlin worked in an acute care setting providing medical nutrition therapy and nutrition education to patients. Caitlin is passionate about neutralizing food for her patients and takes a non-diet approach to nutrition education.

Rachel Dehart MS, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist II
Rachel Dehart graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Public & Community Health from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2007. She received her Master of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy from Towson University in 2010. Rachel is currently an occupational therapist on the Children’s Short-Term Inpatient Unit where she adapts and grades activities to meet various physical, emotional, and cognitive levels of children aged 3-12. Rachel facilitates Life Skills and Time Management occupational therapy groups in the CED Intensive Outpatient Program to assist patients with re-engagement in meaningful occupations at home and within the community.

Annie Hanley, LGSW
Family Therapist
Annie Hanley graduated from University of South Carolina with a Masters of Social Work in 2014. She is currently certified as a Licensed Graduate Social Worker and is working towards her LCSW-C licensure. Prior to joining the Center for Eating Disorders, Annie provided individual and family therapy at an eating disorder treatment center at both the inpatient and outpatient levels of care. She also has experience using the Trauma-Focused CBT model to work with children who have experienced trauma. In her current role, Annie works as a family therapist in the inpatient, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient levels of care. She also facilitates groups in the intensive outpatient program (IOP), including the Tuesday IOP Collaborative Care group for family members and support people. Her past research includes examining the role of peer influence on eating disorder development.

Brianna Garrold, ATR
Clinical Art Therapist
Brianna Garrold received her BA in Fine Arts from Notre Dame of Maryland University in 2010 (formerly College of Notre Dame of Maryland) and her MA from The George Washington University in Art Therapy in 2012, with additional coursework in counseling and Trauma-Informed Care. Currently, Brianna works with inpatient, partial hospitalization, and Intensive Outpatient Program patients using the art process to help patients identify and express their emotions, manage anxiety, and treat body image distortions. Brianna received her ATR in September 2014, and is currently working towards completing the LCPC, and the LCPAT, Licensed Clinical Professional Art Therapist.

Morgan Krumeich, Psy.D.
Clinical Coordinator, Intensive Outpatient Program
Dr. Morgan Krumeich graduated from The George Washington University in 2014 with her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. Prior to obtaining her doctoral degree, Dr. Krumeich obtained a Masters in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University as well as a Masters in Education (specializing in Applied Child Studies) from Vanderbilt University. She previously spent two years at Sheppard Pratt as a psychology extern at The Lodge School, where she conducted individual therapy, in addition to co-leading group and family therapy. Dr. Krumeich completed a year of internship as a school psychologist in the Newark Public School System before returning to Sheppard Pratt in 2014 to become Clinical Coordinator at the Center for Eating Disorders Intensive Outpatient Program. Dr. Krumeich has specialized training in working with children and adolescents, but she has experience (and enjoys!) working with individuals of all ages.

 

Integrating Art & Body Image in the 8th Annual Love Your Tree Campaign

The President’s Committee on Arts & Humanities released a report in 2011 entitled Reinvesting in Arts Education. The report included a long list of evidence to support the benefits of integrating art throughout various disciplines in schools by “teaching ‘through’ and ‘with’ the arts”.  These benefits included fewer discipline problems, increased graduation rates, and improved test scores.  Even more interesting, using artistic mediums to teach, led to more interest in the subject matter, increased motivation to learn the topic at hand, and even the “advantage of embedding knowledge in long-term memory”.  Simply put, art not only makes things more fun and enjoyable to learn, it helps the brain to convert information in deeper, more meaningful ways that we remember longer.

While the President’s report encourages schools to use these benefits to improve learning in subject areas such as science, math and language arts, there are great  implications for learning other things – like positive body image and media literacy.  These are the goals of The Center for Eating Disorders’ Love Your Tree Campaign.  Now in its 8th year, Love Your Tree is arts-based campaign open to middle school, high school and college-aged youth, many of whom subscribe very strongly to our culture’s “thin ideal”.

“Thin-ideal internalization refers to the extent to which an individual cognitively “buys into” socially defined ideals of attractiveness and engages in behaviors designed to produce an approximation of these ideals.” (source)

Love Your Tree utilizes the creative poster-making process, media literacy skills and cognitive dissonance theory to help students internalize new ideals that support body diversity and self-acceptance.  Based on the President’s Report, using art as the educational tool helps to convey this knowledge in an effective, enjoyable way.  It also means that positive changes in body image that take place throughout participation in the campaign are more likely to be long-lasting.  Why is this important?  A positive body image is associated with higher levels of self-esteem overall and can serve as a protective factor against the development of eating disorders.

The 8th Annual Love Your Tree (LYT) campaign launches officially on July 12th.  Visit the LYT website to find out how your school or community organization can get involved and schedule a Love Your Tree workshop.

Questions?  Call (410) 427-3886

*Love Your Tree posters from past years will be on display in a traveling exhibit on August 25th through September 2nd, 2013 at The Shops at Kenilworth in Towson, MD.  We invite you to stop by to view the artwork and get more information about the campaign.

 

 

 

 

The 6th annual “Love Your Tree” Poster Campaign

Love Your Tree

Merging positive body image & creative arts in schools and on campuses across Maryland

July 15 – December 16, 2011

WHAT is Love Your Tree?

Love Your Tree is an arts-based body image campaign based on the work of author and activist, Eve Ensler.  Ensler’s award winning play, The Good Body sends a message to stop hating our bodies and encourages us all to challenge society’s narrow definition of beauty. The Love Your Tree program was created six years ago as a creative avenue for this important message to reach young people in schools and organizations throughout our state and beyond. Middle school, high school and college students from across Maryland are invited to create and submit original posters that illustrate their positive response to the phrase, “Like a tree, my body is…”. This campaign provides students with an opportunity to use art as an avenue for learning about and expressing messages of self-acceptance and appreciation for body diversity.  Center for Eating Disorders staff are available to provide free, on-site Love Your Tree workshops for schools and youth organizations wanting to take part in the campaign.

WHEN:

Love Your Tree workshops are offered August through December of 2011.  Call (410) 427-3886 or email kclemmer@sheppardpratt.org to schedule.  Poster entries must be submitted by December 16th, 2011.

WHO:

Middle School, High School and College-age students throughout Maryland can participate in groups, classes, organizations, or as individuals.  One poster per person.  Educators, counselors, youth leaders and parents are encouraged to help facilitate participation in the campaign.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED:

Schedule a workshop and/or download the following documents for details on how to submit a poster:

  • 2011 Call-for-Posters (pdf)
  • Student Artwork Registration Form (pdf)
  • All artwork MUST reflect original student ideas and designs.
  • Poster entries must be no smaller than 9″x12″ and no larger than 12″x18″.  Only two- dimensional media will be accepted.
  • For more information, contact the CED Outreach Department at (410) 427-3886 or email kclemmer@sheppardpratt.org.

MORE INFO:

The campaign will culminate in February 2012 with a special recognition ceremony and a public exhibit of student artwork.  Students will receive awards for their artwork and one poster will be chosen for professional reproduction and promotion of the Love Your Tree message.  You can check out photos of the 2010 poster exhibit and reception here on our Facebook page.

The campaign’s central theme, Love Your Body, Love Your Tree encourages self-awareness, media literacy, health and well-being, advocacy and an appreciation for the diversity of beauty.