Eating disorders in film: Important reminders during awards season #popcultureED

 


Over 13 percent of teen girls suffer from an eating disorder by the age of 20. It’s not just girls either: disordered eating is almost as common in males as females and can extend long into adulthood. When we get right down to it, eating disorders are serious and people living with them have a higher risk of dying compared to same-aged peers. Still, disordered eating is often joked about and normalized in pop culture. This ‘awards season’, we’re nominating moments from popular movies of the past that show just how common distorted ideas about bodies, diet and food are in our culture. We still love some of these classic comedies, but let’s be careful to challenge unhealthy behaviors as we watch.

GIPHY Video Audience Giving a STanding Ovation

Unfortunately, some movie scenes can be quite triggering for folks with eating disorders and those in recovery. It’s not uncommon to see detailed ED thoughts and behaviors in films that that are never challenged or paired with appropriate education. So, we’ve taken a few movie examples below and added important reminders and fact-checking opportunities.

It’s possible to enjoy films while also thinking critically about their messaging. You might also want to actively decide whether to watch or not to watch before engaging with specific films that you know will normalize or showcase disordered eating.

First up on our #popcultureED tour is…


“THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA”

This movie, starring 2019 SAG awards winner Emily Blunt, reminds us that no goal is ever worth starving for. Emily Blunt’s character frequently makes comments about her restrictive eating and undeniable pursuit of a thinner body.

Nourishing your body consistently is a better way to keep yourself healthy enough to reach your career goals and be present to enjoy them. If you’re struggling to overcome thoughts that equate thinness with success, you’re not alone. Take a step and ask for help before things get worse. Whether you’re a fashion designer, a father, a teacher, or an artist, you deserve to be free of food and weight obsession.

 


“ROMY AND MICHELLE’S HIGH SCHOOL REUNION”

Romy and Mishelle share all sorts of diet obsessed banter in this movie, including this extremely dangerous quip. Reality Check: Candy is delicious, but it doesn’t provide nearly enough energy on its own for everything your amazing body does each day. All foods can fit in a healthy pattern of eating but one type of food on its own – whether candy or kale – can never meet all your nutritional needs. Incorporating a variety of fun and nourishing foods is best.

 


“MEAN GIRLS”

Did you know that some of the most common side effects of dieting are mood changes, depression and irritability. That could be one reason why Regina was always so negative and, quite frankly, pretty nasty to the people around her. Luckily, this movie does teach us that trying to be “perfect” can take its toll.

Did you know that perfectionism is a risk factor for the development of eating disorders?  Perfectionism can also cause you to miss out on opportunities to learn from mistakes and may ultimately get in the way of living a balanced, rewarding life.

 


“A CINDERELLA STORY”

Our bodies need different nutrients to fuel them. Cutting out entire food groups or sources of energy can cause major problems for your body (and really limit your options when eating out). One of the side effects often noted by people with eating disorders is that they begin to isolate from friends and family since they no longer feel comfortable eating around other people or they literally can’t find anything on the menu that fulfills the “rules”.

Social isolation can lead to all sorts of other diffculties and can worsen depression and anxiety. If you’ve noticed that you or a friend are retreating from meals or other previously enjoyed activities it might be time to seek support.

 


“ZOOLANDER”

Derek and Hansel are misinformed when it comes to losing weight. The fact is, purging is not an effective way to lose weight or prevent weight gain. In fact, over time, purging behaviors are associated with weight gain (and a whole host of serious medical consequences). On top pf being misinformed, the characters explode in laughter when Matilda opens up to them about her own history with bulimia.

This is obviously a comedy but it’s still important to remind ourselves while watching that purging is NEVER funny and purging is never a safe behavior. Don’t be like Derek and Hansel. If a friend shares with you that she or he is struggling, take it seriosly. If you need resources to help a friend, check out the Let’s Check In Discussion Guide.

 


“CLUELESS”

Cher and her friends engage in awful lot of weight shaming, diet talk and appearance bashing throughout this movie. (It’s actually hard to find a single scene without it).

Critical body talk and weight shaming – even when self-directed – has a lot of negative consequences. When you criticize your own body, it impacts you and the people around you negatively, making everyone more distracted by and less accepting of their own appearance.

Our thoughts affect our feelings and behaviors so it’s important to learn how to curb negative self-talk and practice saying kind things to yourself. Remember, your vibe attracts your tribe. Work on body acceptance and you’ll be more likely to attract friends who are body positive too.

 


“BRING IT ON” 

Sports have the power to promote self-esteem but not with a coach like Sparky Polastri who flat out disparages bodies and encourages restrictive eating disorders among his athletes.  Any coach who puts an emphasis on weight is bad news for the whole squad.

Not eating enough to fuel your workout can reduce strength, speed, and stamina and lead to increased risk of injury from things like stress fractures, fainting and muscle cramps – not what you want when you’re on top or bottom of the pyramid!

Sparky’s advice is way off; athletes burn a lot of energy through their training, so they actually need to eat more than non-athletes to properly fuel their bodies. Never be afraid to get a second opinion if a coach is steering you wrong.

 


“PITCH PERFECT”

Food shaming is ALL AROUND US in the movies and in real life so we get pretty used to hearing stuff like this. Something you think is a harmless joke about what someone is eating might actually have major repercussions for them.

We never know how the people around us feel about food or their bodies, so it’s best not to make offhand comments about what they should or shouldn’t be eating. Also, burgers are great and can be enjoyable and nourishing at any age!

 


“LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE”

Did anyone else’s heart break a little when Richard told Olive that ice cream would make her fat? In real life, instilling a fear of fatness does not keep kids (or adults for that matter) from gaining weight, but it can contribute to negative body image and disordered eating, including bingeing on foods that are deemed by adults to be forbidden or off-limits.

A better message for kids? All bodies are good bodies and it’s OK to enjoy a variety of different foods. You might also want to check out these other 8 tips for raising body positive kids (who are also competent eaters).

 


The Oscars

As you watch the Oscars and other awards shows this season, let’s cheer on the great acting and fun story lines while also keeping in mind how popular films – even comedies and parodies – can influence our own thoughts and expectations regarding food, weight and eating.

Join the conversation with us on social media using #popcultureED.

If you’ve had an eating disorder in the past or are in the early stages of recovery, sometimes it helps to have a specific support plan for watching potentially triggering or body shaming movies. Read more about that here: How to stay recovery-focused when interacting with triggering media

Don’t forget, eating disorders are serious and risky if untreated. The first step is awareness; If you suspect that you or someone you know has an eating disorder, visit  eatingdisorder.org or call 410-938-5252 for a free phone assessment.

Telemental Health: Using Technology to Overcome Barriers to Eating Disorder Recovery


The highly specified nature of eating disorder care lends an important fact about treatment: Evidence-based eating disorder treatments are as complex as the disorders themselves and require well-trained and experienced clinicians to provide such specialized care. However, the complex and specialized nature of treatment yields one of the main challenges facing the field of eating disorder care today: There simply aren’t enough available providers to meet the needs of patients, and those qualified to offer evidence-based treatment tend to be concentrated in urban areas.1,2

Barriers to Quality Care

Eating disorders, on average, affect at least 30 million Americans of all ages and genders.3 Several effective treatments for eating disorders exist that have been shown to greatly improve physical health and mental wellbeing in a majority of patients. Evidence-based treatments such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and family-based therapy are designed to target specific concerns within particular eating disorder diagnoses and populations.4 But for patients with eating disorders living in rural areas, there are few treatment options. As a result, they are often forced to make difficult decisions, choose between less than optimal options, and deal with potentially negative consequences such as:

  • Traveling far distances to available specialty providers
  • Sacrificing excessive time away from school or work
  • Paying for travel in addition to treatment
  • Receiving lower level care from a provider with no experience or specialized training in the treatment of eating disorders
  • Opting to not get treatment at all and continuing to suffer with the serious consequences of an eating disorder.
One potential solution to the lack of readily accessible care for eating disorders is telemedicine, also known as telepsychology or telemental healthcare. 

Telemedicine allows clinicians to deliver specialized care to patients in a remote location via videoconferencing. In the field of general health care, telemedicine has existed for decades as a means to provide treatment to patients who could not travel to qualified providers. In this format, a patient can receive the same high-quality care they would from a specialist treatment center remotely in the comfort of their own home. Telemedicine is a relatively new method for eating disorder treatment, but research studies have shown its effectiveness to be practically equivalent to that of traditional face-to-face therapy.5

Though more research is needed to support this method of delivering therapy, the existing studies show that eating disorder treatment delivered through telemedicine can lead to positive outcomes such as:

  • The establishment of a healthy weight1,6
  • Decreased concerns about shape and weight1,2
  • Positive relationships with the providing clinician5

Disadvantages of telemedicine typically include technological difficulties,7 though rapid improvements in communication technology will likely combat issues found in past telemedicine research.8

Telemental Health offers a path to high-quality treatment for individuals affected by eating disorders who otherwise might not have access to it.

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt now offers telemental health services for patients who live far distances from our offices. Dr. Jennifer Moran and Dr. Ekaterina Amarando are trained and licensed to provide psychotherapy for patients located in the state of Maryland, and Dr. Meghan Gaare is trained and licensed to provide psychiatric care for patients in the states of Maryland and Virginia.

For inquiries related to receiving telemedicine care, please call (410)-938-5252, or visit CED Telemental Health Program.

 


Written by: 
PHOTO Jacquelyn PattonJacquelyn Patton, Research Assistant
Jacquelyn is a graduate student currently pursuing her Masters in Clinical Psychology at Towson University, with the intent to earn her degree in May 2020. She received her Bachelors of Science in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2017. As an undergraduate, Jacquelyn served as a research assistant for the Center for Addiction, Personality, and Emotions Research where she conducted a study examining the impact of racism and racial/ethnic identity formation on health-risk behaviors, including disparate patterns of substance use. She joined the research team at CED as a volunteer research assistant in 2018, working under the supervision of Dr. Sproch. In this role, Jacquelyn is currently researching the utility and efficacy of telemedicine in the treatment of eating disorders.

 


References

1. Anderson, K. E., Byrne, C. E., Crosby, R. D., & Le Grange, D. (2017). Utilizing telehealth to deliver family-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 50, 1235-1238. doi:10.1002/eat.22759

2. Simpson, S., Bell, L., Britton, P., Mitchell, D., Morrow, E., Johnston, A. L., & Brebner, J. (2006). Does video therapy work? A single case series of bulimic disorders. European Eating Disorders Review, 14, 226-241. doi:10.1002/erv.686

3. Eating Disorder Statistics. (2018). National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Retrieved from http://www.anad.org/education-and-awareness/about-eating-.disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/

4. Yager, J., Devlin, M. J., Halmi, K. A., Herzog, D. B., Mitchell, J. E., Powers, P., & Zerbe, K. J. (2006). Practice guidelines for the treatment of patients with eating disorders. (3rd ed.) Retrieved from https://psychiatryonline.org/pb/assets/raw/sitewide/practice_guidelines/guideline s/eatingdisorders.pdf

5. Mitchell, J. E., Crosby, R. D., Wonderlich, S. A., Crow, S., Lancaster, K., Simonich, H., … & Myers, T. C. (2008). A randomized trial comparing the efficacy of cognitive–behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa delivered via telemedicine versus face-to-face. Behaviour research and therapy46, 581-592. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2008.02.004

6. Goldfield, G. S., & Boachie, A. (2003). Delivery of family therapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa using telehealth. Telemedicine Journal and E-Health, 9, 111–114.  doi:10.1089/153056203763317729

7. Chakrabarti, S. (2015). Usefulness of telepsychiatry: A critical evaluation of videoconferencing-based approaches. World Journal of Psychiatry, 5, 286-304. doi:10.5498/wjp.v5.i3.286

8. Waugh, M., Voyles, D., & Thomas, M. R. (2015). Telepsychiatry: Benefits and costs in a changing health-care environment. International Review of Psychiatry27, 558–568. doi:10.3109/09540261.2015.1091291

 

 

NEDA Walk: There are many ways to make a difference


Despite their increasing prevalence, eating disorders receive significantly less funding than other major mental illnesses, and a lot of misinformation still exists about who is impacted and just how serious eating disorders can be. As treatment providers we know that for every person who walks through our doors and receives treatment, many others never get the help they need. We are participating in a NEDA Walk this year to try to help change that. As NEDA shares on their website, there are 30 million great reasons to participate in a walk. If you’re wondering why you should walk, consider the following.

To help raise awareness & restore hope…
Eating disorders are widely misunderstood illnesses, and old stereotypes and myths often prevent people from seeking help. Help fight stigma and shine a light on eating disorders as a serious public health issue.

To help save lives…
Eating disorders are associated with many different short-term and long-term health consequences, some of which are very serious and others that can be fatal. By participating in the NEDA Walk, you’ll be raising funds that support life-saving programs, advocacy efforts, and research initiatives.

To feel less alone…
Eating disorders can be extremely isolating illnesses. When you’re struggling or supporting a loved one with an eating disorder, it’s easy to feel like you’re the only one in the world who is going through it but we promise, you’re not. Participating in a NEDA Walk is a great way to come together as a recovery-focused group and engage as a community in positive change.

While there are countless reasons to participate in a Walk, it’s also extremely important to consider that there may be reasons not to walk too. Given that eating disorders often involve energy deficits and an unhealthy relationship with exercise, it’s important to remind potential walkers that your safety and recovery always need to come first.

Typical NEDA walks are 1- 2 miles in distance but for someone with an eating disorder, significant movement or walking – even a short distance – could be unsafe or contrary to treatment goals. Definitely check in with your treatment providers prior to participation if you’re having any of these symptoms:

  • recent fatigue, weakness or dizziness
  • episodes of fainting, falling or near falls (tripping) in past month
  • muscle cramps, numbness or paresthesia’s (limb falling asleep) in your extremities
  • recent dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities
  • inability to complete a meal without acting on symptoms the morning of the walk

Furthermore, even if you haven’t had the physical symptoms listed above, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is your motivation to attend the walk driven primarily by a desire to engage in exercise?
  • Have your thoughts about the walk included calculations of distances, steps, calories, etc.?
  • Do your current treatment goals include taking a break from exercise or restrictions on movement?

If the answer to any of those questions is yes, be sure to set parameters with your treatment team around the best and safest way for you to participate. For example, it is important to remember that you can attend a NEDA Walk without doing the walk portion of the event! Bring a lawn chair, listen to the keynote speakers, and cheer on your team. You can also bring a buddy who can help you stay focused on the important aspects of the walk and who can help ensure you’re well-fueled before the event, symptom-free during the event and full of hope throughout the day.

Lastly, it’s 100% OKAY if you can’t attend a walk right now because you’re taking care of yourself. Sometimes self-care means saying no to some things so you can say yes to treatment or recovery. You can always participate by sharing about the cause online – or – use the event day as a catalyst for your own recovery. Locate a local support group, read a book about recovery, or make that call to a therapist you’ve been putting off.

However you choose to participate, remember that you are worth it and you are not alone.

………………

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt will be joining NEDA and a host of other eating disorder and body image organizations for the Baltimore NEDA Walk on September 30 at Goucher College. Find out more here.

32 Ways to Stay Recovery-Focused During a Snow Storm

If you are one of the many people on the east coast dealing with this most recent winter storm, you might be struggling to cope with loneliness, boredom or the stress of being stuck at home in heavy snow and cold temperatures. Snow days can certainly be fun but they can also present some challenges for individuals who struggle with mental health issues and eating disorders in particular. That’s why we put together this list of activities and strategies for maintaining a recovery-focused snow day. You can print or bookmark this post and refer back as need for coping skills and ideas for staying recovery-oriented on any unexpected days off throughout the year.


32 Recovery-Focused Activities, Tips & Strategies:

  1. First things first. Review what food you have available and write down a plan for your remaining meals and snacks for the day that is aligned with recommendations from your treatment providers. Post your plan in the kitchen or somewhere you will see it throughout the day. Set up reminders to take the breaks you need to prepare and eat each meal.
  2. Call or text a friend to check-in. 
  3. Paint something.
  4. Start a new knitting or craft project. 
  5. Read an old book that you loved the first time around.
  6. Record your observations about the storm in a journal.
  7. FaceTime with a family member that might be feeling lonely in the storm.
  8. Try this breathing exercise.
  9. Catch up on THANK YOU cards. 
  10. Watch funny videos on YouTube.
  11. Create a gratitude list and add to it throughout the snow storm. When the storm is over, hang it up somewhere where you can admire it and refer back to it.
  12. If you know you tend to get sucked in to social comparisons, limit your time on social media to specific hours each day. Block or hide accounts that you notice only leave you feeling negatively. Follow one or two new accounts that are #bodypositive or recovery-focused. We recommend @NEDAstaff, @LindaBaconHAES and @MelissaDToler to get started.
  13. Look up and print information about eating disorder support groups in your area and make plans to attend once the roads are cleared. Add it to your calendar with an alert so you don’t forget.
  14. Challenge your perfectionism. Do something in a mediocre way and be okay with it. If you don’t consider yourself an artist, it’s okay. Just grab a pencil and start sketching or start tearing up some old magazines for a collage project and get to work. Accept imperfection. Celebrate imperfection.
  15. Make a snow day music playlist full of upbeat classics that warm your heart. 
  16. Go through your closet and gather old or uncooperative clothes that are not serving you or your recovery. Bag them up and get them ready to donate when the snow clears.
  17. Do research on countries and tourist attractions you might like to visit someday.
  18. If you’re an essential employee and need to be at work during the storm, remember that your well-being is also essential. Be assertive about your need for meals, breaks and sleep. 
  19. Throw in a load of laundry you’ve been putting off. When it comes out of the dryer, fold it right away. It’s a great way to keep your hands busy and it’ll be warm too.
  20. Watch a favorite movie and just be present with the movie instead of being on your computer or phone at the same time.
  21. If you’re feeling like the walls are closing in on you, get bundled up and check on elderly neighbors.
  22. Listen to the snow falling and do a 3-minute mindfulness exercise.
  23. Have LEGOs and/or kids in the house? Invite your kids to build something with you.
  24. Send a picture of yourself smiling to someone who has been having a rough time and might need a smile.
  25. Water all of your indoor plants
  26. Drink some hot tea and read the paper
  27. Once the snow passes, put on your boots, explore the outdoors and take some photos; look for people and animal tracks in the snow.
  28. Do a puzzle.
  29. Make a list of compliments you’ve received in the past and honor them, even if you couldn’t accept or believe them at the time they were given.
  30. Make plans for next week. Schedule a meal with a supportive friend or buy tickets online for a show or event you’d like to see.
  31. Make a meal plan and grocery shopping list for the coming week. Email it to a dietitian or therapist on your treatment team.
  32. Don’t have a treatment team?  Call (410) 938-5252 for a free phone assessment and to be connected with an Intake Coordinator at The Center for Eating Disorders who can talk with you about available options.

What else would you add to the list? How are you planning to make your snow day more memorable and recovery-focused? Share your ideas with us on Facebook and Twitter.


www.eatingdisorder.org

12 Tried and True Ways People Upheld a Recovery-Focused Holiday


Looking back on this holiday season, it’s safe to say that social gatherings and celebratory feasts posed some significant challenges for anyone trying to develop a more peaceful relationship with food – including those in recovery from an eating disorder. That’s why The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt launched a social media campaign called the “12 Days of Eating Disorder Recovery.” The initiative shared tips on how to maintain healthy relationships with food through the holiday season and beyond. These are summarized below – one for each day of the 12 days – so you can use them to navigate future holiday seasons and get a little help finding the joy and peace within the hustle and bustle.


#12DaysofEDRecovery

Day 1: Keep expectations realistic and set manageable goals that will help you stick to your plan.

Regardless of where you’re at in recovery, celebrations, holiday feasts and schedule changes can pose challenges. Planning ahead and setting realistic expectations can help you stay focused on what truly matters.


Day 2: Grab a notebook or journal and write down all the reasons why recovery is important to you.

While you’re at it, make another list of support people. Figure out in advance who you will call if things get overwhelming or if you simply need to get out of your own head. Things that help you cope daily are still needed during the holidays.

If you’re headed out of town, pack your suitcase with your notebook along with other recovery tools. This could be tangible things like a fidget cube, fun book, art supplies or a favorite essential oil.


Day 3: Connect in safe and meaningful ways with others in recovery.

Recovery from an eating disorder is a journey that requires support, encouragement and ongoing motivation. Individuals with eating disorders and their loved ones can find hope and help in others who understand what they’re going through. Support groups and therapy groups can be a great way to strengthen recovery skills and help remind you that you are not alone.


Day 4: Set a goal today that has nothing to do with food, weight or your eating disorder.

It’s common for social gatherings to revolve around food in our culture, especially during the holidays. These celebrations often lead to an intensified emphasis on meals and eating for those working on recovery from an eating disorder. Keep doing what you need to do to fuel your body in recovery, but try also setting a goal for yourself that has nothing to do with food or your eating disorder.


Day 5: Don’t let your eating disorder make decisions for you in the grocery store. Use price or brand to inform decisions instead of reading nutrition labels.

Whether we like it or not, grocery shopping is part of adulthood. But for the millions of individuals living with an eating disorder, this everyday task feels overwhelming and becomes a significant barrier to recovery. If you are worried about buying items for upcoming gatherings or celebrations, this tip can help make grocery shopping more manageable.


Day 6: Defuse grocery shopping stress by bringing a friend, avoiding crowds and shopping at smaller stores in off-peak hours.

If you’ve had negative experiences with grocery shopping, you can start developing more positive associations. A Registered Dietitian may provide some easy steps for managing your grocery list.

Ask your dietitian for support, or consider adding one to your treatment team if you haven’t done so. You can also go with a friend or support person the first few times to help distract from any eating disorder thoughts and avoid being triggered by diet products.


Day 7: Infuse your New Year with body positivity and gratitude.

Be prepared to see your newsfeed flooded with New Year’s resolutions, gym memberships and diet plans in the coming weeks. To balance triggering and unhealthy messages, remember to reality check all the bogus weight-loss ads and surround yourself online and IRL with body-positive people and organizations.

Pay attention to which images and messages contribute to your feeling badly about yourself or your body and do what you can to remove them from your daily life. When you notice them, remove them (unsubscribe, throw them away, etc.) or challenge them.

Focus on gratitude for the functionality of the breath in your body, the ability to move, see, hear, taste or touch. Try to elevate those in your mind as you go through your day.

Create your own New Year’s goals with body positive thoughts. Work to set aside unhealthy ideals and embrace your body.


Day 8: Tackle eating disorder stigma by dispelling myths among friends and family.

Major misconceptions about eating disorders are widespread, even among those closest to us. Family can be a key component to recovery success. Unfortunately, some family and friends may still subscribe to ED myths that lead to stigma and might make it harder to ask for help or to seek treatment. Help educate and increase awareness about eating disorders among your loved ones.


Day 9: Friends and family can be a great support network. Be open with the people closest to you about how they can best support you.

Holiday conversations often revolve around what people are eating or not eating, who’s eating too much or too little and even criticism or praise about body weight and size.  Did this happen for you during Chanukah or Christmas this year?

The start of a new year can be a great time to enlist family members as allies by being open about your needs and boundaries. Set the stage for healthier gatherings in the new year by having a post-holiday conversation with them about how their words impacted you and what they can do instead to support you at the table and in other stressful situations.


Day 10: Meditate or listen to soothing music to start your day in a positive place.

It’s not just about food and body image. Incorporating mindfulness in the new year can be a way to care for your overall mental health. If you’re heading back to work or school after winter break, find a way to change up your routine to build in mindfulness practices.  Even just three minutes of meditation can help you set a positive intention for the day.

You can be mindful in your social connections too. Cultivate awareness about the different support each generation of your family can offer. Hanging out with cousins can be a nice way to connect and get support on specific life stage issues like being away at college, parenting stress, job hunting, etc. On the other hand, reaching out to older generations, like grandparents, is an opportunity to see how priorities can shift throughout life. Even the youngest generations have something to offer you in your recovery-focused festivities.


Day 11: Aim for balance and flexibility rather than perfection.

Individuals who are perfectionists often struggle with the urge to compare themselves to people around them. Research has shown perfectionism to be a significant risk factor for the development of eating disorders.

Constantly striving to be perfect with food or appearance during the holidays can lead to tension and stress. Even those holiday photo cards hanging around your house can trigger negative social comparisons. Try making some small changes to help ease perfectionist tendencies this time of year.


Day 12: Support is essential to your wellbeing. Recovery is possible with treatment and support.

Whether you are an individual working on recovery, or a loved one who is close to someone in recovery during this time of year, it’s important to remember that support is essential to wellbeing.

Remember, you don’t have to go through this alone.

Ask for help.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of an eating disorder and you’re not connected to a therapist or receiving treatment, don’t wait any longer.  There is no reason to go through this alone. Call (410) 938-5252 for a free phone assessment today.


This holiday season, and year-round, carry these tips with you. Recovery is possible and recovery is worth it.

Easing Anxiety About Grocery Shopping During Eating Disorder Recovery

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Easing Anxiety About grocery Shopping - Woman with Shopping Cart [IMAGE]Whether we like it or not, grocery shopping is a necessary task of adulthood. It can be annoying or simply unenjoyable for anyone who is living a busy life or just doesn’t enjoy shopping or cooking. Most adults however, make it in and out of the grocery store regularly without significant disruption, problems or stress. But for the millions of individuals living with an eating disorder, an everyday task like buying food for themselves or their families feels completely overwhelming. Just thinking about going food shopping can trigger intense anxiety and may result in avoidance or elevated eating disorder symptoms. Actually going to the store and getting out before the milk gets warm seems impossible at times.

Since having consistent, structured and fulfilling meals are such a fundamental part of eating disorder recovery, being able to source and purchase the food for those meals then becomes a primary part of treatment.  If someone is too anxious to step foot in the store, obsesses over the label on every item or finds they just wander aimlessly, it can really inhibit their ability to bring home the foods they need to meet their nutritional goals. As a result, difficulties with grocery shopping can become a significant barrier to recovery. That’s why our Outpatient Nutritional Coordinator put together these tips to help individuals with eating disorders (or anyone really) navigate the grocery experience and become more confident in your shopping ability.

Plan, Plan, Plan: This is one of the most impactful tips! Planning your meals ahead saves you time and money. It can also decrease anxiety at meal times since you know that you have something in place and what to expect. In order to maintain stable meals, you must have a menu planned and food available to meet that plan; remember to incorporate foods from all food groups. Set aside one hour, one day a week for meal planning. Planning ahead also cuts down on the amount of trips to the store you need to take during the week.  One to two trips to the grocery store per week is reasonable

Organize your list: Based on your planned menu, create a grocery list. Breaking it down into the sections of the grocery store can cut down on time spent in the store. People that “wing it” end up wandering too long or revisiting the same aisle two or three times. Keep a pad of paper in your kitchen or a list on your phone where you can write down food staples that you run out of during the week; add them to your main grocery list before you go.

Be realistic: Set realistic expectations when you plan your meals. What do you have going on this week?  Which nights will you have more time to cook?  Which nights do you need something easy to assemble?  At which meals would it make sense to use leftovers?   Pick up a variety of foods that require different levels of preparation.

Mission possible: Set a time limit and stick to it.  Make it your mission to be at the register in 30 minutes or less.

Add support: Go with a friend or support person for the first few times. Whether they know you have an eating disorder or not, this will help distract from any eating disorder thoughts in your head and will keep you more on task.  Letting your support person know your goal of being at the register in 30 minutes or less can also help hold you accountable to not wasting time wandering aisles or compulsively comparing items.

Stick with what you pick: If you find yourself spending too much time reading labels or comparing similar products, try to make the decision based on which one is on sale that week. Choosing the item based on price can also help expose you to different brands and allows you to discover which one your taste buds truly prefer.  Another way to decrease label reading is to view the grocery store ad online before going to the store when making your list.  This allows you to view items without being able to read their labels and to commit to having them on your grocery list based on what is on sale.  This is helpful for reducing time comparing products, getting exposure to trying different products out, and can save you money!

Shrink the store: Sometimes it’s fun to shop at a large grocery store and to have a lot of options, but for some people more options = more anxiety. If that’s the boat you’re in, try shopping at a smaller store such as Aldi, Eddie’s, or the grocery section at Target.   It’s a lot easier to decide which yogurt to buy when you have three options instead of thirty!  Having less options of yogurt, cereal, bread, crackers, etc, can reduce time spent in the aisles and will help you get out of the store faster.

Ditch the diet products:
Avoid being lured into fat free, sugar free, “diet products.”  They do not satisfy and will only leave you feeling hungry and stuck in the “diet mentality.”  Normalized eating incorporates regular products that are more satisfying and enjoyable.

Avoid the crowds: Try to shop at times when the grocery store is not as busy. Typically during the week, 3-6pm tends to be the busiest time at the grocery store.  Sundays are also very busy days.  Try to go in the morning, later in the evening, or on Saturday.   You can also look your grocery store up on google maps and look at their “popular times” bar graph to see less busy times to shop.

Check your status:
Be mindful of your vulnerability factors.  Are you tired? Stressed? Hungry? If the answer is yes, plan on engaging in some self-care first and going to the grocery store when you are feeling more rested, stable and satiated.

Ask an RD: If you need help planning meals, making grocery lists, expanding variety, and setting goals for improving your confidence with grocery shopping, ask your dietitian for support. If you do not have a dietitian, consider adding one to your treatment team if you are working through an eating disorder.

Remember that with learning any new skill, it takes practice and time.   If you have negative experiences with grocery shopping in your past, try some of these tips to begin developing more positive associations with going to the grocery store. Over time, this will help decrease your anxiety around grocery shopping. Plus, having food available for meals will help you stay on track on your journey to recovery.


The Center for Eating Disorders is excited to announce the launch of a brand new Grocery Shopping Support Program designed to aid individuals working on recovery from eating disorders including anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. Parents/Caregivers of children and adolescents are also eligible for participation. Program components and goals include:

  • Snack/meal/menu planning
  • Grocery list development
  • Incorporation of challenging foods
  • Efficiently utilizing time spent in stores
  • Managing impulsive food purchases
  • Identifying triggers and coping skills
  • Decreasing anxiety around food and food purchases
  • Exposure to food-based environment
  • Individualized treatment goals

If you’re interested in scheduling a grocery support appointment, please call (410) 938-5252.  If you have questions about the program you can also email Hannah Huguenin.


Written By: Hannah Huguenin MS, RD, LDN
Outpatient Nutrition Coordinator

Hannah has been an integral part of The Center for Eating Disorders’ staff since 2008, and provides individual nutritional counseling for the outpatient population. In her role at The Center, she manages the outpatient nutrition team and leads program development. She was instrumental in building the Center’s new Grocery Shopping Support Program. Hannah also provides ongoing support to help patients decrease eating disorder behaviors, meet their nutritional goals and improve their relationship with food through nutrition education.

How to Stay Recovery-Focused When Interacting with Triggering Media

In our previous post we discussed a variety of reasons that individuals with eating disorders, especially those in the early stages of recovery, may choose not to watch the Netflix film To The Bone or other films they know could create roadblocks in their continued recovery.

With that said, triggering media has always been around and will always be a part of our society so it’s helpful to know how to navigate it.  Many individuals in long-term recovery or later stages of treatment might feel prepared to watch a film or read a book about eating disorders, despite triggering content. Many of our clinicians have helped to shape such exposure into therapeutic experiences for patients who are ready.  For example, during periods of strong recovery, seeing a film like To The Bone can be an opportunity to reflect on one’s own experience, see things from a new perspective, process lingering eating disorder thoughts or channel anger towards the eating disorder in productive ways.

If you’ve considered all of the options and decide you do want to watch a film about eating disorders, these are a few things to consider that can help you do so in safe and productive ways.

  1. Don’t watch alone. Watch with a support person you can trust and communicate openly with them about how it is impacting you in the moment. You might even consider pausing the show periodically to breathe, reflect and talk.
  2. Time it right. Only watch it when you know you’ll be attending a therapy session or support group within a few days so you can explore your reactions and get help challenging any distorted thoughts or concerns about what you see on screen. If you currently have a lot of other life stressors or you’re in a time of transition (moving, starting school, going through a divorce, etc.) you may want to consider waiting to watch until things settle down.
  3. Challenge the ED thoughts. Consider journaling about aspects of the movie that you find triggering and then refute and challenge the inaccurate, negative or distorted thoughts.
  4. Be an activist. Write a letter to the director of the film or to the editor of a local newspaper regarding what you liked or didn’t like, what was helpful vs. not helpful or what you’d like to see more of when it comes to films about eating disorders. For example, while To The Bone features one person of color and one male in supporting roles, the movie’s star and protagonist is a young, white, upper-middle class woman with anorexia. This doesn’t help to dismantle stereotypes about who is and isn’t impacted by eating disorders. Consider writing a letter that advocates for greater diversity in eating disorder representation or about another aspect of recovery that feels important to you.
  5. Create an escape clause. Allow yourself the option to stop watching at any point throughout the film. Eating disorders can be associated with all-or-nothing thinking so it may feel like once you start the movie you have to finish it, but remember it’s not so black and white. At any point, if you feel triggered or uneasy about what you’re watching, turn it off.
  6. Plan ahead. Decide in advance upon an alternative show to watch or a self-care activity you can do when the film is over (or if you stop watching early) that will help you sustain a more recovery-focused mindset.

Do you use these strategies or have other ideas for navigating triggering media safely?  Tweet them to us @CEDSheppPratt and we’ll add to the list. 


You may also be interested in reading: 
To Watch or Not to Watch: That is the Question, Navigating “To The Bone” and other potentially triggering movies about eating disorders

 

 

 

 

 

A Focus on Body Image & Eating Disorders in Boys & Men for #menshealthmonth

“Get Lean in 2017”
“Shrink Your Gut,”
“Add Bulk To Your Arms”
“Get Rock Hard Abs,”

These are just a few of the typical headlines that can be seen on fitness and “health” magazines geared towards men. While there has been fairly widespread awareness cultivated around the media’s negative impact on women’s body image, not as much attention has been paid to how the media targets men and boys with similar body shaming tactics.

Our culture in general, and the media specifically, often pushes women to lose, lose, lose so they can be smaller, thinner and closer to an elusive definition of “perfect” but the opposite message is often being pushed towards men; most advertising and traditional media suggests the male quest for perfection requires they be bigger, stronger and more muscular.  Products previously peddled exclusively towards women – hair removal items, weight loss diets, tanning products, and plastic surgery – are expanding their markets by making men take a harder, longer and much more critical look at their own appearance.

A 2016 review of five national studies found that 20 to 40 percent of men were unhappy with some aspect of their looks, including physical appearance, weight, and muscle size and tone. An earlier study found that college aged men who viewed media images of muscular men showed a significantly greater discrepancy between their own perceived muscularity (what they think they look like) and their ideal body (what they feel they should look like). The researchers suggested their results could show that even brief exposure to such idealized images can increase body dissatisfaction in men.

Despite this ongoing push for men to get bigger and stronger, over the last decade we’ve also seen the juxtaposition of thinner versions of masculinity.  You can see it when looking at modern male mannequins with impossibly small waists and very slim – yet sculpted – abdomens and legs.  Conflicting body ideals abound. So what is the message after all…get bigger, but stay lean? Be muscular, but still fit in those trendy skinny jeans? It’s mind numbing to try and understand, and even more impossible to attain, yet these are the messages that boys are forced to decipher from a very young age and often continue to wrestle with into adulthood and middle age.

Given all of this, it isn’t that surprising a 2014 study of more than five thousand males aged 12 to 18 years found nearly 18 percent of boys are highly concerned about their weight and physique. Of the boys who were highly concerned with their weight, about half were worried only about gaining more muscle, and approximately a third were concerned with both thinness and muscularity simultaneously.

It’s important to note that, as is also the case with females, photoshopped advertisements and a general lack of diversity in the media’s representation of bodies does not in and of itself cause eating disorders. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are complex illnesses with genetic and biologic underpinnings. However, environmental triggers such as narrow or unrealistic body ideals in the media can contribute to increased levels of body dissatisfaction which has been identified as a risk factor for eating disorders.

Dealing with unhealthy media messages is something that almost every man will have to deal with. As is also the case with girls and women, the dangers lie in the drastic steps some boys and men may take to try to manage increasing body image anxiety. Guys who are more dissatisfied with their bodies may be more likely to engage in risky weight loss, bulking or sculpting behaviors such as extremely restrictive diets, cleanses, steroids, supplements or excessive exercise. These are unhealthy and potentially dangerous behaviors for anyone.  However, in boys and men who are genetically at risk for eating disorders, these types of behaviors can set the stage for an eating disorder, triggering changes in the brain, disrupting metabolic functioning, dysregulating hunger/fullness cues and often worsening body image, mood and anxiety symptoms. Boys and men who have a history of trauma, are involved in sports or careers that promote weight loss and perfection, and those with close family members with a history of an eating disorder are also at higher risk for developing one themselves.

Eating disorders have long been miscategorized as purely a women’s issue, even by some healthcare professionals. As a result it’s quite common for major warning signs like excessive exercise or drastic changes to diet to be overlooked or even congratulated in men. Stigma and stereotypes in the eating disorders combine to make it difficult for men who are stuck in the cycle of disordered eating to break out of it and get help. It is suggested that 25-40% of people with eating disorders are men, yet they only make up about 10% of people seeking treatment.

Talking openly about eating disorders can help minimize shame and embarrassment for males struggling with these issues. At The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt, we’ve been treating men with eating disorders for more than twenty-five years and we’re encouraged by the changes we hear in the conversations more recently. More men have been speaking out locally and using national platforms to raise awareness. In just the last year, Zayn Malik of the band One Direction discussed his struggle with an eating disorder and anxiety, performer/songwriter Matthew Koma wrote a poignant blog about his recovery from anorexia, and Joey Julius, a football player at Penn State, made a series of public statements regarding his decision to seek treatment for binge eating disorder. Their messages all point to a resounding hopefulness stemming from the reality that treatment is available and men can heal from their eating disorders and body dissatisfaction.

So what can you do to help the men in your life?

Start by checking in with them. The Let’s Check In campaign is all about empowering individuals, families and communities to talk openly about eating disorders and to strengthen support for individuals of all genders who might feel alone. When it comes to eating disorders, early identification and prompt help-seeking can make a big difference. You can play a role in supporting prevention and recovery from eating disorders simply by educating and preparing yourself.

Know the risk factors and pay attention to any sudden shifts in diet, exercise routine or increased negative comments about themselves or their body. If you’re unsure, the confidential online assessment is a quick tool that can help you gauge whether someone you love might be at risk.  Second, if you are seeing increasing warning signs plan to check in with your friend or loved about your concerns and provide them with compassion and resources.  A fact sheet, conversation guide and additional resources are available at www.letscheckin.com/.


Regis Aguglia, LCSW-C

Written by:
Regis Aguglia, LCSW-C,
Family Therapist at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt
Regis Aguglia earned his Masters in Social Work from the University of Maryland in 2010. Prior to joining The Center for Eating Disorders in 2014, Regis provided individual, family and group therapy in outpatient and school-based settings and gained experience treating individuals struggling with substance abuse. As a Family Therapist in The Center’s inpatient and partial hospital programs, Regis works with families to understand the impact of an eating disorder on the family system and helps to strengthen communication, coping skills, nutritional stability and recovery-focused support. Regis also facilitates a number of inpatient therapy groups including dual diagnosis groups for patients with co-occurring substance abuse and a specialty group for boys and men with eating disorders.

Turning a Body Positive Summer into a Body Positive Year

 

Turning a Body Positive Summer into a Body Positive Year(2)


We spent the summer talking about several steps you can take to turn body dissatisfaction into body acceptance. We also presented some of the very important reasons why someone might be motivated to embark on such a task. The bottom line: negative body image can negatively impact all other areas of life – career, academics, physical health, social interaction and intimate relationships. As many as 67% of women ages 15-64 withdraw from life-engaging activities because they feel badly about their bodies. And women are not alone in the struggle; Thirteen percent of college-aged men say their appearance is traumatic or difficult to handle as well.As we head into the fall, its important to remember that negative body image doesn’t just go away for most people simply because the beach vacations and relentless bikini body advertisements subside. As much as we wish that was the case, we know body image is much more than a seasonal hazard.

Body insecurity will follow young boys and girls into middle school classrooms where they may stop raising their hands or engaging in class discussion to avoid drawing attention to their appearance.

Body insecurity will follow young adults onto college campuses around the country where it, paired with genetic risk factors like perfectionism and anxiety, plus fear of the Freshman 15, may provide fuel for the development of an eating disorder.

Body insecurity will follow the new mom to the play date where she will silently compare and scrutinize her body. She’ll be sold a thousand different ways to get her pre-baby body back.


Body insecurity will follow the quiet colleague home from work each night.  He refuses to hang out with friends or start dating until he finally “bulks up” again.

These may be the realities of day-to-day life with body dissatisfaction but they don’t have to be the end of the story. In addition to the 3 Steps we laid out during the #bodypositivesummer campaign, here are a few guidelines to help boost body image in any season.

1. Don’t postpone important events or fun life goals for appearance or weight-related reasons. Putting off a special vacation, not applying for your dream job or not going on a date until you lose XX lbs. is a recipe for missed opportunities and delayed happiness. Saying you’ll get around to something in few months can quickly turn into a few years, or even decades. If you’ve been waiting to live life fully because you’re unhappy with your body, consider taking one small step today towards whatever it is you’ve been putting off. Research flights, update your resume or call an old friend.

2. Stop Fat Chat.  When among friends or in social settings commit to steering the conversation away from appearance-based judgments and into more positive territory.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released a report urging pediatricians and parents to stop focusing on weight, or even mentioning weight, during discussions with children and teens. The reason?  Focusing on weight backfires, often leading to unhealthy behaviors that are associated with both obesity and eating disorders. The same is true for adults. Stop focusing on your weight as the golden marker of health and you may actually find it’s easier and/or more fulfilling to engage in healthful behaviors.

3. Cleanse your social media feed. Disconnect from the negativity, surround yourself with positive, healthy, and uplifting social media accounts.  If you’re online quite a bit, there is no reason to allow Instagram followers who consistently engage in fat talk or body criticism to cloud your view of yourself. You have every right to unfollow Twitter users that promote weight loss or diet products, even if they are close friends or family members. Remember, you are the curator of your accounts; use that power to cultivate a body positive presence for yourself online.

4. Last but definitely not least…ASK FOR HELP.  Negative body image can be a risk factor in the development of eating disorders or may trigger relapse while in recovery from one. If you’re having a lot of negative body image thoughts throughout the day or they’re impacting your behaviors around food and weight it might be time to seek support. Specific evidence-based therapies like Cognitive Behavior Therapy can be effective in addressing body dissatisfaction. It can help to tell a trusted friend, spouse, or parent that you’re struggling and ask them to support you in getting connected to a counselor or therapist who is trained in these specific techniques.

Not sure where to turn?  You can complete a confidential online self-assessment here or call (410) 938-5252 for more information.

Visit eatingdisorder.org for additional resources.   

 

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GLOSSARY of Terms: Body Image. Body Dissatisfaction. Body Shaming. Body Acceptance.

refuse to miss out


Having a #bodypositivesummer may sound relatively straight forward; however some of the accompanying language may require a bit more explanation. This guide is meant to help break down some of the vernacular you come across within the #bodypositivesummer movement and in other similar discussions about body image.

Body image refers to the subjective picture or mental image of one’s own body. The key word being subjective. In other words, body image is how you see yourself.  Medical definitions of body image extend to include the individual’s emotional beliefs and attitudes about the image they perceive. The same feature might be experienced differently and thus, elicit different emotions from person to person. For example, to one individual, being tall might come with a sense of pride and a belief that his or her height is a strength, while another individual feels embarrassed about being tall and believes that it sets him or her apart in a negative way.  An individual’s body image state – negative or positive –  is shaped by lived experiences, peer groups, media and marketing, family, community and cultural attitudes, as well as other external sources of body ideals and expectations.

The divergence of one’s body image from sociocultural beauty ideals can lead to body dissatisfaction. Grogan (2008) defines body dissatisfaction as a person’s negative thoughts about his or her own body.  Negative feelings about body type, weight, body hair, and skin tone are known to be intensified during summer months due to an increased focus of marketing on these insecurities, greater body exposure due to warmer temperatures, and other socially influenced factors. Beauty standards (also referred to as the thin ideal or body ideal) are often narrow, unhealthy and down-right ridiculous for both women and men. These unattainable “standards” may also lead to dangerous behaviors, such as excess sun exposure, dieting, and potentially by extension, disordered eating. They also set the stage for forms of hurtful interactions such as body shaming.  Body shaming, also referred to as body bashing,  is any form of mocking, bullying, or insults focused on deviations from body or appearance “norms”. This type of bullying behavior can take place in person during face-to-face interactions or online across social media platforms. Body shaming is normalized and encouraged by advertisements that imply certain bodies are not suited for certain places (like the beach) or for specific articles of clothing (like shorts or a bathing suit).

The antidote to body dissatisfaction is body acceptance.  Body Acceptance is approving of and caring for your body despite it’s real or perceived “imperfections”.  This is inclusive of other terms like body positive, body neutrality and size acceptance.  Being body positive or working towards body acceptance, doesn’t mean you absolutely love the way you look all the time. It simply means you accept and honor all bodies – including your own – as good and worthy of care and respect.  It also means you are willing to confront your own internalized weight bias and challenge other stereotypes or assumptions based on a person’s appearance.

We live within a culture that encourages body dissatisfaction. But we have within us individually, the power to be body positive. In doing this for ourselves, we also create space for others, including friends and family members with eating disorders and/or serious body image disturbances, to re-engage in experiences they might be prone to avoid.

Be a part of the #bodypositivesummer movement.  Follow along on Twitter or Facebook for blogs, tips, resources and opportunities to tell us how you are creating a season of body positivity.

Find more info here.

 

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