Eating disorders in film: Important reminders during awards season #popcultureED

 


Over 13 percent of teen girls suffer from an eating disorder by the age of 20. It’s not just girls either: disordered eating is almost as common in males as females and can extend long into adulthood. When we get right down to it, eating disorders are serious and people living with them have a higher risk of dying compared to same-aged peers. Still, disordered eating is often joked about and normalized in pop culture. This ‘awards season’, we’re nominating moments from popular movies of the past that show just how common distorted ideas about bodies, diet and food are in our culture. We still love some of these classic comedies, but let’s be careful to challenge unhealthy behaviors as we watch.

GIPHY Video Audience Giving a STanding Ovation

Unfortunately, some movie scenes can be quite triggering for folks with eating disorders and those in recovery. It’s not uncommon to see detailed ED thoughts and behaviors in films that that are never challenged or paired with appropriate education. So, we’ve taken a few movie examples below and added important reminders and fact-checking opportunities.

It’s possible to enjoy films while also thinking critically about their messaging. You might also want to actively decide whether to watch or not to watch before engaging with specific films that you know will normalize or showcase disordered eating.

First up on our #popcultureED tour is…


“THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA”

This movie, starring 2019 SAG awards winner Emily Blunt, reminds us that no goal is ever worth starving for. Emily Blunt’s character frequently makes comments about her restrictive eating and undeniable pursuit of a thinner body.

Nourishing your body consistently is a better way to keep yourself healthy enough to reach your career goals and be present to enjoy them. If you’re struggling to overcome thoughts that equate thinness with success, you’re not alone. Take a step and ask for help before things get worse. Whether you’re a fashion designer, a father, a teacher, or an artist, you deserve to be free of food and weight obsession.

 


“ROMY AND MICHELLE’S HIGH SCHOOL REUNION”

Romy and Mishelle share all sorts of diet obsessed banter in this movie, including this extremely dangerous quip. Reality Check: Candy is delicious, but it doesn’t provide nearly enough energy on its own for everything your amazing body does each day. All foods can fit in a healthy pattern of eating but one type of food on its own – whether candy or kale – can never meet all your nutritional needs. Incorporating a variety of fun and nourishing foods is best.

 


“MEAN GIRLS”

Did you know that some of the most common side effects of dieting are mood changes, depression and irritability. That could be one reason why Regina was always so negative and, quite frankly, pretty nasty to the people around her. Luckily, this movie does teach us that trying to be “perfect” can take its toll.

Did you know that perfectionism is a risk factor for the development of eating disorders?  Perfectionism can also cause you to miss out on opportunities to learn from mistakes and may ultimately get in the way of living a balanced, rewarding life.

 


“A CINDERELLA STORY”

Our bodies need different nutrients to fuel them. Cutting out entire food groups or sources of energy can cause major problems for your body (and really limit your options when eating out). One of the side effects often noted by people with eating disorders is that they begin to isolate from friends and family since they no longer feel comfortable eating around other people or they literally can’t find anything on the menu that fulfills the “rules”.

Social isolation can lead to all sorts of other diffculties and can worsen depression and anxiety. If you’ve noticed that you or a friend are retreating from meals or other previously enjoyed activities it might be time to seek support.

 


“ZOOLANDER”

Derek and Hansel are misinformed when it comes to losing weight. The fact is, purging is not an effective way to lose weight or prevent weight gain. In fact, over time, purging behaviors are associated with weight gain (and a whole host of serious medical consequences). On top pf being misinformed, the characters explode in laughter when Matilda opens up to them about her own history with bulimia.

This is obviously a comedy but it’s still important to remind ourselves while watching that purging is NEVER funny and purging is never a safe behavior. Don’t be like Derek and Hansel. If a friend shares with you that she or he is struggling, take it seriosly. If you need resources to help a friend, check out the Let’s Check In Discussion Guide.

 


“CLUELESS”

Cher and her friends engage in awful lot of weight shaming, diet talk and appearance bashing throughout this movie. (It’s actually hard to find a single scene without it).

Critical body talk and weight shaming – even when self-directed – has a lot of negative consequences. When you criticize your own body, it impacts you and the people around you negatively, making everyone more distracted by and less accepting of their own appearance.

Our thoughts affect our feelings and behaviors so it’s important to learn how to curb negative self-talk and practice saying kind things to yourself. Remember, your vibe attracts your tribe. Work on body acceptance and you’ll be more likely to attract friends who are body positive too.

 


“BRING IT ON” 

Sports have the power to promote self-esteem but not with a coach like Sparky Polastri who flat out disparages bodies and encourages restrictive eating disorders among his athletes.  Any coach who puts an emphasis on weight is bad news for the whole squad.

Not eating enough to fuel your workout can reduce strength, speed, and stamina and lead to increased risk of injury from things like stress fractures, fainting and muscle cramps – not what you want when you’re on top or bottom of the pyramid!

Sparky’s advice is way off; athletes burn a lot of energy through their training, so they actually need to eat more than non-athletes to properly fuel their bodies. Never be afraid to get a second opinion if a coach is steering you wrong.

 


“PITCH PERFECT”

Food shaming is ALL AROUND US in the movies and in real life so we get pretty used to hearing stuff like this. Something you think is a harmless joke about what someone is eating might actually have major repercussions for them.

We never know how the people around us feel about food or their bodies, so it’s best not to make offhand comments about what they should or shouldn’t be eating. Also, burgers are great and can be enjoyable and nourishing at any age!

 


“LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE”

Did anyone else’s heart break a little when Richard told Olive that ice cream would make her fat? In real life, instilling a fear of fatness does not keep kids (or adults for that matter) from gaining weight, but it can contribute to negative body image and disordered eating, including bingeing on foods that are deemed by adults to be forbidden or off-limits.

A better message for kids? All bodies are good bodies and it’s OK to enjoy a variety of different foods. You might also want to check out these other 8 tips for raising body positive kids (who are also competent eaters).

 


The Oscars

As you watch the Oscars and other awards shows this season, let’s cheer on the great acting and fun story lines while also keeping in mind how popular films – even comedies and parodies – can influence our own thoughts and expectations regarding food, weight and eating.

Join the conversation with us on social media using #popcultureED.

If you’ve had an eating disorder in the past or are in the early stages of recovery, sometimes it helps to have a specific support plan for watching potentially triggering or body shaming movies. Read more about that here: How to stay recovery-focused when interacting with triggering media

Don’t forget, eating disorders are serious and risky if untreated. The first step is awareness; If you suspect that you or someone you know has an eating disorder, visit  eatingdisorder.org or call 410-938-5252 for a free phone assessment.

4 social media changes you can make for the New Year…in 5 minutes or less


The pressures of resolutions and new beginnings after the holiday season can be overwhelming. So why not make a change that will help free up time and headspace while also improving body image?  Your social media life may be an area to evaluate…

Social media has undoubtedly become more and more prominent in our lives. On the one hand, these sites have showcased benefits, such as maintaining social connections and sharing meaningful content and life experiences with others1. On the other hand, problematic social networking site use (or SNS), such as commenting on others’ pictures and “lurking,” have been shown to have negative consequences on body image, self-esteem, and eating disorder symptoms. Even taking selfies, and excessively editing and manipulating these images, has been associated with greater body-related and eating concerns2.

As you reflect on the past year, think about how much time you spent scrolling through social media and comparing likes. What if you could start the new year off with a healthier and more productive approach to care for yourself and your self-esteem? These four simple tips can help you change social media behaviors in the new year.

 

1. Limit Overall Social Media Use


On average, we use social networking sites for over an hour a day3. While some of this social media time may be used in productive ways, maladaptive use of these sites for over an hour a day could lead to significant negative thoughts and feelings. Think about unplugging and limit time spent scrolling!

  • Set aside a specific time every day to use your favorite sites.
  • Delete the apps off your phone, limiting access to social media only from your computer.
  • Use digital reminders or post-it notes on your computer to remind you of other activities you might enjoy more than scrolling through a social media feed. Texting a friend? Planning a vacation? Registering for a class?

 

2. Think Critically About Social Media


For some, it might seem impossible to remove social media entirely in a world where use is growing rapidly. So, while we can limit use overall, it can be greatly beneficial to change the way we perceive what we are exposed to when we are using social media. While scrolling through Facebook and Instagram and viewing everyone’s carefully selected and manipulated “best-self”, be sure that you are thinking critically about what you are seeing and posting.

  • Remind yourself that images are often edited and re-edited!
  • Be mindful of comparing yourself with peers or celebrities’ photos on social media.
  • Notice if you are starting to feel poorly about yourself when scrolling and decide if it would be a good time to log off.

 

3. Remove or Block Negative Content


Exposure to content that promotes the “thin ideal”, or the promotion of a desire to be skinny or fit, is more common now than ever in a world of body-altering photo applications and “photoshopping” in the media. Many individuals with an eating disorder are prone to participate in negative social comparisons and are more likely to internalize the “thin ideal,” making them more susceptible to the negative effects of this type of imagery. Take some time to go through your social media and analyze what you are being exposed to and how it makes you feel.

  • Are anyone’s photos making you feel poorly about yourself?
  • Is a celebrity promoting disordered eating or dangerous products (like cleanses or detox teas) to maintain a “perfect figure?”
  • If images or accounts are not helping you work towards recovery, hide the posts or block photos.

 

4. Follow More Positive Accounts


While the negative effects of social media have been the focus here, there are many reasons why these platforms have skyrocketed in recent years. Sites such as Facebook and Instagram can be great to share accomplishments, keep in contact with distant friends, or even see what your favorite musician or politician is up to. We can help to control what kind of messages and content we are exposed to by changing who we follow on social media.

  • Fill your feed with positive role models, quotes, and positive peers to help create a body-positive environment that focuses on more than appearance to achieve self-worth.

Below are just a few examples of body positive or recovery-focused Instagram accounts you can choose to follow in the new year!

 


 

Written By:

Ava Sardoni, Research Assistant
The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt 

Ava is currently pursuing her Master’s in Clinical Psychology at Loyola University Maryland, with intent to graduate in May of 2019. She also earned her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Loyola University Maryland, graduating in May of 2018. Her past research projects include researching the relationship between specific personality traits and motivations for using online dating applications.


References:

  1. Cohen, R., Newton-John, T., & Slater, A. (2018). ‘Selfie’-objectification: The role of selfies in self-objectification and disordered eating in young women. Computers in Human Behavior, 79. 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.10.027
  2. McLean, S.A., Wertheim, E.H., Masters, J., Paxton, S.J. (2016). A pilot evaluation of a social media literacy intervention to reduce risk factors for eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 50. 847-851. doi: 10.1002/eat.22708
  3. Uhls, Y.T., Ellison, N.B., & Subrahmanyam, k. (2017). Benefits and Costs of Social Media in Adolescence. Pediatrics, 140(Supplement 2, S67-S70. Retrieved from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/Supplement_2/S67.long

Is your school or classroom a body-positive space for students?


It is widely accepted, from preschool to high school, that teachers and school staff play a big part in helping students to develop positive self-esteem. Many of those same teachers may not be aware that one of the most significant factors in an individual’s overall self-esteem is body image. So why does the way we see/think/feel about our bodies matter so much and what does that have to do with our classrooms? Consider the following:

  • 31% of adolescents do not engage in classroom debate for fear of drawing attention to how they look.1
  • 20% of teens say they stay away from class on days when they lack confidence about their appearance.1
  • On days when they feel bad about their looks, 20% of 15 to 17 year old girls will not give an opinion and 16% will avoid school altogether.2
  • A study of more than 11,000 teens found that students who saw themselves as overweight (regardless of actual weight) had lower academic performance than those who did not. This is important because it means the perception of being overweight – likely because of cultural bias and negative stereotypes that come with that – was a more significant determinant of academic performance than medically defined obesity.

If the way kids feel about their bodies impacts attendance, classroom engagement, academic performance and individual self-esteem, it makes a lot of sense for schools to be paying attention to body image.  Below are just a few ways you can work to establish a school environment that is body positive and doesn’t reinforce harmful weight stigma, appearance ideals or the diet mentality.


6 Guidelines for a Body Positive Classroom


Representation matters. 

Do a thorough scan of books, posters and other materials around your classroom. Do they include a wide representation of people with diverse bodies – both in weight and shape but also skin color, gender presentation and physical ability? Will all kids see themselves represented in the positive imagery around your classroom?

If your class involves physical fitness or health messaging, consider whether your resources show kids and adults of all shapes and sizes being active or just thin/muscular people? Are fatter bodies exclusively used in imagery meant to deter or shame people for specific behaviors? If you’re in need of new imagery, check out these inclusive stock fitness photos from The Body Positive Fitness Alliance.

Above all, remember that kids who feel good about their bodies, regardless of their weight, are more likely to engage in healthy behaviors and less likely to engage in risky or harmful behaviors like smoking and bingeing.4 To help bring body positivity into your class, add books and resources to your lesson plan or syllabus that promote body acceptance and provoke age appropriate conversations about the natural diversity of bodies. Messaging that focuses on 1) how health behaviors can make us feel, or 2) developing gratitude for the functionality of our bodies as opposed to what they weigh or look like, can promote self-care and confidence. A list of age-specific body positive resources is included at the end of this post – please scroll down to check it out!


Leave all personal diet-talk at the door and enforce that rule with fellow teachers and school staff.

We know that kids are listening to the adults around them even when we don’t think they are. Casual background discussions about cutting out carbs, trying a new “cleanse” or berating oneself for eating a cupcake are not as innocent as you might think. When little ears – or even mature high school ears – overhear their favorite teacher or respected mentor talking about food and bodies in critical or shameful ways they can internalize those messages. There are many reasons why we encourage adults not to introduce kids to dieting, including the fact that kids who diet are up to 18 times more likely to develop an eating disorder.5

Furthermore, there is no long-term evidence that any fad diets like keto, paleo, Whole30, Atkins or otherwise lead to reliable or sustainable weight loss. In fact, diets have been associated with longterm weight gain. Specifically, adolescent girls who diet are at 324% greater risk for obesity than those who do not.6


Normalize the variety of healthy body changes that take place before and during puberty. 

For example, it’s completely normal (and necessary) for a young girls’ body to store up extra fat before she gets her period for the first time. It’s also common for boys and girls to gain weight and fill out just prior to growth spurts in height. Remember this happens at very different times for different kids. If they experience these normal changes as abnormal or bad, it puts them at risk for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. But If kids (and teachers and parents) can learn to anticipate these changes they may be more likely to trust their bodies as they grow and mature.


Incorporate MEDIA LITERACY into your curriculum.

It doesn’t matter if you teach preschool story time or AP Literature, there are countless opportunities to talk about how to handle cultural messages kids receive about beauty, appearance, health, and weight. The Center for Eating Disorders provides body image and media literacy workshops for educators and parents as well as arts-based campaigns like the Love Your Tree campaign. We also encourage school staff to pursue training in evidence-based prevention programs such as The Body Project and to work with local organizations to incorporate student activism projects that challenge the thin ideal and inspire brands to do better.

 

Weight-based bullying is more common than all other forms of teasing. Establish a policy against weight-based bullying and actively work to reduce body commentary in general.

What’s the difference between a teacher proclaiming “you look amazing! Have you lost weight?” and a student teasing her classmate for “packing on the pounds” over the summer? Not much actually. They both reinforce a negative bias towards larger bodies and establish an unnecessary focus on appearance/size. In our culture it is assumed that saying something one thinks is “nice” about someone’s body is a good thing but praising specific aspects of one’s appearance can be just as detrimental for the school community as a whole because it reinforces the dangerous appearance ideals. Consider the following scenarios:

Malik gets nicknamed “string bean” by the principal because he had a growth spurt and grew much taller and slimmer than his peers. Malik was already feeling self-conscious about his height and knows the principal was just kidding around but now he does everything he can to avoid seeing him in the hallways.

Dean came back to school a size smaller and friends are requesting her “weight loss secrets”. They don’t know she was in treatment for an eating disorder over the summer and has developed heart problems and other health complications as a result.

So what is a school or classroom policy that addresses all of the situations above? Something similar to “We just don’t comment on other peoples bodies” can be the most effective message to dissuade body-talk (praising or teasing) among students and staff.


Encourage colleagues – administrators, school nurses, coaches and physical education teachers – to review the evidence for any interventions they are implementing with regard to weight, health or nutrition. 

Every school should be asking whether there is quality, health-focused research to back up the intervention and does this program have the potential to do more harm than good? The truth is, many of these practices lack research and may have harmful consequences, yet many schools and childcare centers continue to implement them. Examples of such campaigns and curriculums currently include:

  • Publicly weighing kids in gym or health class
  • Giving kids assignments that require them to count calories and track their food
  • Hosting “Biggest Loser” weight-loss competitions among school staff
  • Sending home BMI report cards for students or calculating BMI in class.
  • Shaming kids’ lunch items or teaching very young kids to label food items as good/bad or healthy/junk.

When it comes to BMI report cards, even the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) notes in their report that “Little is known about the outcomes of BMI measurement programs, including effects on weight-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of youth and their families. As a result, no consensus exists on the utility of BMI screening programs for young people.7

There is no indication that providing kids and parents with BMI information leads to any significant behavior change or improved health outcomes. Furthermore, unless safeguards are solidly in place, a risk of harm exists when children are simply told there is something wrong with their body size. Risks for body comparison and weight-based teasing also increase.8

What else are you doing to reduce weight-based teasing and make your classroom a safe place for students of all shapes and sizes? Tweet us @CEDSheppPratt today and share your experiences. 

 


Body Positive Resources:

For School Administrators:

Preschool/Elementary Kids & Parents:

Middle School:

High School/College:


Links to References:

  1. Ignoring it doesn’t make it stop.
  2. Beyond stereotypes: rebuilding the foundations of beauty beliefs.
  3. Perception of Overweight is Associated with Poor Academic Performance in US Adolescents
  4. Does Body Satisfaction Matter? Five-year Longitudinal Associations between Body Satisfaction and Health Behaviors in Adolescent Females and Males
  5. Onset of adolescent eating disorders: population based cohort study over 3 years
  6. Risk Factors for Body Dissatisfaction in Adolescent Girls: A Longitudinal Investigation
  7. A Report on the Facts and Concerns About BMI Screening in Schools

3 Basic Recovery Tips for Moms & Moms-to-be with Eating Disorders

Pregnancy and motherhood can be extremely daunting. The “what-ifs?”, “can I manage it all?” and “what will my body do?” internal dialogue often begins quite early in the process of parenthood, even among women without eating disorders.  When a woman struggles with body dissatisfaction and disordered eating, normal concerns throughout pregnancy and parenting can escalate into major anxiety. They may also fuel a new or renewed focus on weight and shape that can lead to harmful behaviors like restriction, purging, bingeing or obsessive exercise. Co-occurring depression – or postpartum depression – can also be risk factors for disordered eating.

According to data from the CDC, the average age at which women have their first child is 28 and this has been steadily rising for decades. As of 2016 however, the demographic with the highest birth rates are actually women in their early thirties (ages 30-34).1 This holds true across all fifty states as well as all racial and ethnic groups.

Interestingly, women between the ages of 30 and 40 are also increasingly seeking treatment for eating disorders. Eating disorders affect about 10% of women during their reproductive years and this number may be growing.  With this in mind, it has become exceedingly apparent that there is a need to tailor treatment to mothers and mothers-to-be in order to effectively assist women during this stage of life.

Pregnancy-related body image concerns combined with the extra stressors of parenting – and feeding – young children can complicate eating disorder recovery efforts. But there are also opportunities and strengths in this new role and certain things moms-to-be can do to stay recovery-focused during the adventures of pregnancy and parenthood. Below are three very basic tips to help provide a starting point for a healthy transition.

 

1. BE HONEST.

If you’re currently pregnant, tell your OB or midwife that you have a history of an eating disorder and about your current or past symptoms.

Some women say they feel shame or guilt in expressing feelings of body-dissatisfaction or disclosing ED symptoms to their medical providers, especially during pregnancy and post-partum. If you find yourself battling these thoughts, it’s helpful to remember that eating disorders thrive on silence and secrecy. Keeping symptoms a secret usually means things get worse, not better. Being open with your OB or midwife allows them to better care for you and more accurately monitor the health of your baby. When your providers know about the eating disorder they can also do more to support your recovery efforts; this could include connecting you with a local support group or tailoring discussions about food and exercise appropriately. Remember, eating disorders are serious illnesses – not simply a choice or lifestyle. It’s okay to let go of the guilt and shame so you can move forward with help.

 

2. EMBRACE IMPERFECTIONS.

You can’t do it all perfectly—nobody can (even if it looks like they do on social media).

More mothers than ever are raising their children while managing full-time careers outside of the home and trying to keep up with ever-increasing expectations for the always perfect outfit, an exquisitely clean house and an expertly planned family vacation.On top of it all, posting finely tuned photos on social media to prove it all happened can almost feel mandatory.Moms who internalize this pressure are understandably overwhelmed because perfection is a race that no one wins. Remember, even the people who look like they have it all together online, are only sharing what they want people to see. It’s essentially a person’s curated highlight reel; the behind-the-scenes shots may not be so picture perfect.

Given that the trait of perfectionism is an established genetic risk factor for the development of eating disorders, it’s easy to see how these increasing expectations and media pressures can create extra challenges for pregnant and parenting moms working on eating disorder recovery. If you find yourself constantly comparing your house, your body, your parenting or your life in general to people you see on TV or friends on social media it’s important to discuss these influences with a therapist or treatment team. You can also do a self-audit of your feed and make some changes to ensure you are cultivating a body positive presence across your social media platforms.

 

3. PRIORITIZE RECOVERY

Self-care isn’t selfish.

There’s a reason why the flight crew on every plane instructs parents flying with children to put on their own oxygen masks in an emergency before putting one on their child.  It might feel counterintuitive or even selfish to do so but we know it’s not. Why? Because it’s much harder to take care of other people – especially infants and toddlers – if you’re not caring for yourself.  When it comes to mental health and eating disorders, you may need to prioritize your recovery efforts now so that you have the physical ability and mental clarity to prioritize your family in the long-term. Seeking therapy, keeping up with appointments and staying connected to other moms who talk openly and authentically about the challenges of motherhood are integral to recovery.

 


At The Center for Eating Disorders, we recently launched an outpatient therapy group to help pregnant and parenting moms with eating disorders do the hard Kristen Norris, LCPCwork of prioritizing recovery while caring for their families. The group, which meets weekly, focuses on skills for balancing recovery and motherhood, addressing body image concerns and strategies for feeding the family. In addition to building recovery skills, this group can also be a way to help moms recharge and gain support. It is open to pregnant women and parenting moms of any age and stage.

The Moms’ group is held on Thursdays at 10 a.m. at outpatient department in Physician’s Pavilion North, Suite 300. Please contact Kristen Norris for additional information or to enroll in the group. She can also be reached by phone at 410-427-3904.


References:

  1. Mathews TJ, Hamilton BE. (2016). Mean age of mothers is on the rise: United States, 2000–2014. NCHS data brief, no 232. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.

12 Tried and True Ways People Upheld a Recovery-Focused Holiday


Looking back on this holiday season, it’s safe to say that social gatherings and celebratory feasts posed some significant challenges for anyone trying to develop a more peaceful relationship with food – including those in recovery from an eating disorder. That’s why The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt launched a social media campaign called the “12 Days of Eating Disorder Recovery.” The initiative shared tips on how to maintain healthy relationships with food through the holiday season and beyond. These are summarized below – one for each day of the 12 days – so you can use them to navigate future holiday seasons and get a little help finding the joy and peace within the hustle and bustle.


#12DaysofEDRecovery

Day 1: Keep expectations realistic and set manageable goals that will help you stick to your plan.

Regardless of where you’re at in recovery, celebrations, holiday feasts and schedule changes can pose challenges. Planning ahead and setting realistic expectations can help you stay focused on what truly matters.


Day 2: Grab a notebook or journal and write down all the reasons why recovery is important to you.

While you’re at it, make another list of support people. Figure out in advance who you will call if things get overwhelming or if you simply need to get out of your own head. Things that help you cope daily are still needed during the holidays.

If you’re headed out of town, pack your suitcase with your notebook along with other recovery tools. This could be tangible things like a fidget cube, fun book, art supplies or a favorite essential oil.


Day 3: Connect in safe and meaningful ways with others in recovery.

Recovery from an eating disorder is a journey that requires support, encouragement and ongoing motivation. Individuals with eating disorders and their loved ones can find hope and help in others who understand what they’re going through. Support groups and therapy groups can be a great way to strengthen recovery skills and help remind you that you are not alone.


Day 4: Set a goal today that has nothing to do with food, weight or your eating disorder.

It’s common for social gatherings to revolve around food in our culture, especially during the holidays. These celebrations often lead to an intensified emphasis on meals and eating for those working on recovery from an eating disorder. Keep doing what you need to do to fuel your body in recovery, but try also setting a goal for yourself that has nothing to do with food or your eating disorder.


Day 5: Don’t let your eating disorder make decisions for you in the grocery store. Use price or brand to inform decisions instead of reading nutrition labels.

Whether we like it or not, grocery shopping is part of adulthood. But for the millions of individuals living with an eating disorder, this everyday task feels overwhelming and becomes a significant barrier to recovery. If you are worried about buying items for upcoming gatherings or celebrations, this tip can help make grocery shopping more manageable.


Day 6: Defuse grocery shopping stress by bringing a friend, avoiding crowds and shopping at smaller stores in off-peak hours.

If you’ve had negative experiences with grocery shopping, you can start developing more positive associations. A Registered Dietitian may provide some easy steps for managing your grocery list.

Ask your dietitian for support, or consider adding one to your treatment team if you haven’t done so. You can also go with a friend or support person the first few times to help distract from any eating disorder thoughts and avoid being triggered by diet products.


Day 7: Infuse your New Year with body positivity and gratitude.

Be prepared to see your newsfeed flooded with New Year’s resolutions, gym memberships and diet plans in the coming weeks. To balance triggering and unhealthy messages, remember to reality check all the bogus weight-loss ads and surround yourself online and IRL with body-positive people and organizations.

Pay attention to which images and messages contribute to your feeling badly about yourself or your body and do what you can to remove them from your daily life. When you notice them, remove them (unsubscribe, throw them away, etc.) or challenge them.

Focus on gratitude for the functionality of the breath in your body, the ability to move, see, hear, taste or touch. Try to elevate those in your mind as you go through your day.

Create your own New Year’s goals with body positive thoughts. Work to set aside unhealthy ideals and embrace your body.


Day 8: Tackle eating disorder stigma by dispelling myths among friends and family.

Major misconceptions about eating disorders are widespread, even among those closest to us. Family can be a key component to recovery success. Unfortunately, some family and friends may still subscribe to ED myths that lead to stigma and might make it harder to ask for help or to seek treatment. Help educate and increase awareness about eating disorders among your loved ones.


Day 9: Friends and family can be a great support network. Be open with the people closest to you about how they can best support you.

Holiday conversations often revolve around what people are eating or not eating, who’s eating too much or too little and even criticism or praise about body weight and size.  Did this happen for you during Chanukah or Christmas this year?

The start of a new year can be a great time to enlist family members as allies by being open about your needs and boundaries. Set the stage for healthier gatherings in the new year by having a post-holiday conversation with them about how their words impacted you and what they can do instead to support you at the table and in other stressful situations.


Day 10: Meditate or listen to soothing music to start your day in a positive place.

It’s not just about food and body image. Incorporating mindfulness in the new year can be a way to care for your overall mental health. If you’re heading back to work or school after winter break, find a way to change up your routine to build in mindfulness practices.  Even just three minutes of meditation can help you set a positive intention for the day.

You can be mindful in your social connections too. Cultivate awareness about the different support each generation of your family can offer. Hanging out with cousins can be a nice way to connect and get support on specific life stage issues like being away at college, parenting stress, job hunting, etc. On the other hand, reaching out to older generations, like grandparents, is an opportunity to see how priorities can shift throughout life. Even the youngest generations have something to offer you in your recovery-focused festivities.


Day 11: Aim for balance and flexibility rather than perfection.

Individuals who are perfectionists often struggle with the urge to compare themselves to people around them. Research has shown perfectionism to be a significant risk factor for the development of eating disorders.

Constantly striving to be perfect with food or appearance during the holidays can lead to tension and stress. Even those holiday photo cards hanging around your house can trigger negative social comparisons. Try making some small changes to help ease perfectionist tendencies this time of year.


Day 12: Support is essential to your wellbeing. Recovery is possible with treatment and support.

Whether you are an individual working on recovery, or a loved one who is close to someone in recovery during this time of year, it’s important to remember that support is essential to wellbeing.

Remember, you don’t have to go through this alone.

Ask for help.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of an eating disorder and you’re not connected to a therapist or receiving treatment, don’t wait any longer.  There is no reason to go through this alone. Call (410) 938-5252 for a free phone assessment today.


This holiday season, and year-round, carry these tips with you. Recovery is possible and recovery is worth it.

How to Stay Recovery-Focused When Interacting with Triggering Media

In our previous post we discussed a variety of reasons that individuals with eating disorders, especially those in the early stages of recovery, may choose not to watch the Netflix film To The Bone or other films they know could create roadblocks in their continued recovery.

With that said, triggering media has always been around and will always be a part of our society so it’s helpful to know how to navigate it.  Many individuals in long-term recovery or later stages of treatment might feel prepared to watch a film or read a book about eating disorders, despite triggering content. Many of our clinicians have helped to shape such exposure into therapeutic experiences for patients who are ready.  For example, during periods of strong recovery, seeing a film like To The Bone can be an opportunity to reflect on one’s own experience, see things from a new perspective, process lingering eating disorder thoughts or channel anger towards the eating disorder in productive ways.

If you’ve considered all of the options and decide you do want to watch a film about eating disorders, these are a few things to consider that can help you do so in safe and productive ways.

  1. Don’t watch alone. Watch with a support person you can trust and communicate openly with them about how it is impacting you in the moment. You might even consider pausing the show periodically to breathe, reflect and talk.
  2. Time it right. Only watch it when you know you’ll be attending a therapy session or support group within a few days so you can explore your reactions and get help challenging any distorted thoughts or concerns about what you see on screen. If you currently have a lot of other life stressors or you’re in a time of transition (moving, starting school, going through a divorce, etc.) you may want to consider waiting to watch until things settle down.
  3. Challenge the ED thoughts. Consider journaling about aspects of the movie that you find triggering and then refute and challenge the inaccurate, negative or distorted thoughts.
  4. Be an activist. Write a letter to the director of the film or to the editor of a local newspaper regarding what you liked or didn’t like, what was helpful vs. not helpful or what you’d like to see more of when it comes to films about eating disorders. For example, while To The Bone features one person of color and one male in supporting roles, the movie’s star and protagonist is a young, white, upper-middle class woman with anorexia. This doesn’t help to dismantle stereotypes about who is and isn’t impacted by eating disorders. Consider writing a letter that advocates for greater diversity in eating disorder representation or about another aspect of recovery that feels important to you.
  5. Create an escape clause. Allow yourself the option to stop watching at any point throughout the film. Eating disorders can be associated with all-or-nothing thinking so it may feel like once you start the movie you have to finish it, but remember it’s not so black and white. At any point, if you feel triggered or uneasy about what you’re watching, turn it off.
  6. Plan ahead. Decide in advance upon an alternative show to watch or a self-care activity you can do when the film is over (or if you stop watching early) that will help you sustain a more recovery-focused mindset.

Do you use these strategies or have other ideas for navigating triggering media safely?  Tweet them to us @CEDSheppPratt and we’ll add to the list. 


You may also be interested in reading: 
To Watch or Not to Watch: That is the Question, Navigating “To The Bone” and other potentially triggering movies about eating disorders

 

 

 

 

 

To Watch or Not to Watch: That is the Question

Navigating “To the Bone” and other Potentially Triggering or Inflammatory Movies about Eating Disorders

Like most things in life there are benefits and risks that come with exposure to media, especially media that depicts sensitive or potentially life-altering subject matter such as eating disorders, suicide or mental health. As you may have already noticed from the controversial conversations about it, the Netflix movie, To the Bone is no different. The film depicts a young woman, Ellen, in the throes of her eating disorder and follows her through the recovery process which the synopsis points out, includes
help from a “non-traditional doctor” played by Keanu Reeves. It may come as no surprise that the main character, Ellen, is a young, white, very thin, upper middle-class woman, and that the particular eating disorder she is dealing with is anorexia nervosa. Hollywood tends to over-rely on this stereotyped depiction of eating disorders, despite the fact that in reality, eating disorders and the people they impact are much more diverse.

As one of the nation’s longest-running providers of evidence-based treatment for children, adolescents and adults with eating disorders we’ve been asked by numerous patients and families in the previous weeks how to handle such a film.  And while To The Bone may be a new film, this is far from a new question.  Over the last several decades, similar questions have been raised in response to documentaries, blogs, fictional books and memoirs written by individuals recovering from eating disorders.

Decades of observing the impact of this type of media has reinforced our recommendation that individuals who are currently struggling with an eating disorder or those who are in the early stages of treatment and recovery don’t typically benefit from watching movies or reading books that display any of the following characteristics:

  • extremely graphic depictions of people engaged in eating disorder symptoms such as bingeing, purging, chewing/spitting, body checking, over-exercising, self-harming or abusing drugs and alcohol
  • detailed descriptions of ED thoughts and behaviors that are left unchallenged, unexplained or are not paired with sufficient education regarding the consequences
  • conversations that include specific numbers such as weights, clothing sizes, calorie counts or repetitions of exercise.

If you notice any of these characteristics in a movie, show or book, it should be a red flag that it might not be a beneficial resource or recovery-focused activity for someone who is currently struggling.

We always look to support popular media that finds a way to raise awareness and stimulate meaningful discussions about eating disorders in safe and non-triggering ways. With that in mind, we went into our own viewing of this newest movie with high hopes and an open mind. Unfortunately, what we found was that To The Bone ultimately ticks off all three of the red flags mentioned above. Furthermore, the film’s depiction of treatment methods and treatment protocols are far from helpful, safe, or accurate.  As a team of specialized professionals, many of whom have spent their entire careers learning about, researching and utilizing evidence-based treatments for eating disorders, this film was, quite frankly, disappointing and at times difficult for our staff to watch.

On the flip side, it did do a good job of illustrating the immense pain and struggle faced by those who are impacted by these illnesses. It also got people talking about an issue that is usually hushed in society despite the fact that eating disorders impact 20-30 million people.  Our hope would be that some viewers of the film gain insight or information that could help them check in with a friend or loved one who is showing warning signs and needs help.

Taking into account both perspectives and the possibility for all the positive and negative impacts, it’s crucial to think  critically about the media introduced to us as communities, families and individuals.

If you are a therapist, a parent, educator or friend of someone with an eating disorder

It’s really important to empower anyone considering watching a film about eating disorders to feel like they can disengage safely and with your support.  Let them know it’s okay to decide not to watch because it has the potential to be harmful for them and their recovery.  This can be a hard but powerful decision because it builds confidence and sets a precedent for recovery-focused decision-making.  How? Today, it might be saying no to a Netflix film that “everyone else is watching and talking about” but tomorrow it could be saying no to a dangerous cleanse that a favorite celebrity is promoting on social media or saying no to a friend that encourages you to step on her bathroom scale. Learning how to say no to such things, even when the societal pressure and internal urges are strong, is imperative for long-term recovery.

If you have an eating disorder or are in recovery from an eating disorder…

If you’re like a lot of our patients, seeing a trigger warning at the start of a film or hearing in advance that it might be detrimental isn’t always a deterrent and might even make the content more intriguing. We’ve heard from some of our patients that they choose to watch the film despite their own reservations and knowledge of the content.  Most of the reactions included versions of the following:

  • I found myself comparing my body to the actress in the film and thinking that maybe I wasn’t deserving of or didn’t really need treatment since I wasn’t as thin as her.
  • I found myself wishing I could go back to my eating disorder.
  • I was tempted to use “a little bit of my ED behaviors” and was reassuring myself I wouldn’t let it get that bad.
  • If she [the actress Lily Collins] can “lose weight safely” for this role after recovering from an eating disorder in real life than maybe I can too.  

Despite what may be positive intentions for this film, it’s important to be realistic about how it actually plays out for the millions of people with eating disorders who watch it. While not everyone will have reactions like these, we think it’s important for individuals and support people to know it’s a possibility that the person who is struggling with an eating disorder may overlook the negative aspects of the eating disorder on screen and only see the perceived positive or glamorized aspects.

If you are struggling with whether or not to watch this film, or engage with any other eating-disorder focused media, remember that it’s okay to say no. At the very least, we encourage you to discuss your decision with a treatment provider or trusted support person.  If you decide together that watching this type of film might actually be beneficial at certain stages of recovery, check out these guidelines for watching safely.

Some of the most important ways to enhance recovery and prevent relapse include: continuing regular contact with treatment providers, following evidence-based recommendations, engaging in regular self-care and creating a home environment that is conducive to your continued healing and recovery. In this case, that might also include creating a Netflix watchlist that doesn’t have anything to do with eating disorders.

Do you have thoughts on the film or the media surrounding it? Join the discussion on our Facebook page.


Written by Kate Clemmer, LCSW-C, Community Outreach Coordinator, The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt

A Focus on Body Image & Eating Disorders in Boys & Men for #menshealthmonth

“Get Lean in 2017”
“Shrink Your Gut,”
“Add Bulk To Your Arms”
“Get Rock Hard Abs,”

These are just a few of the typical headlines that can be seen on fitness and “health” magazines geared towards men. While there has been fairly widespread awareness cultivated around the media’s negative impact on women’s body image, not as much attention has been paid to how the media targets men and boys with similar body shaming tactics.

Our culture in general, and the media specifically, often pushes women to lose, lose, lose so they can be smaller, thinner and closer to an elusive definition of “perfect” but the opposite message is often being pushed towards men; most advertising and traditional media suggests the male quest for perfection requires they be bigger, stronger and more muscular.  Products previously peddled exclusively towards women – hair removal items, weight loss diets, tanning products, and plastic surgery – are expanding their markets by making men take a harder, longer and much more critical look at their own appearance.

A 2016 review of five national studies found that 20 to 40 percent of men were unhappy with some aspect of their looks, including physical appearance, weight, and muscle size and tone. An earlier study found that college aged men who viewed media images of muscular men showed a significantly greater discrepancy between their own perceived muscularity (what they think they look like) and their ideal body (what they feel they should look like). The researchers suggested their results could show that even brief exposure to such idealized images can increase body dissatisfaction in men.

Despite this ongoing push for men to get bigger and stronger, over the last decade we’ve also seen the juxtaposition of thinner versions of masculinity.  You can see it when looking at modern male mannequins with impossibly small waists and very slim – yet sculpted – abdomens and legs.  Conflicting body ideals abound. So what is the message after all…get bigger, but stay lean? Be muscular, but still fit in those trendy skinny jeans? It’s mind numbing to try and understand, and even more impossible to attain, yet these are the messages that boys are forced to decipher from a very young age and often continue to wrestle with into adulthood and middle age.

Given all of this, it isn’t that surprising a 2014 study of more than five thousand males aged 12 to 18 years found nearly 18 percent of boys are highly concerned about their weight and physique. Of the boys who were highly concerned with their weight, about half were worried only about gaining more muscle, and approximately a third were concerned with both thinness and muscularity simultaneously.

It’s important to note that, as is also the case with females, photoshopped advertisements and a general lack of diversity in the media’s representation of bodies does not in and of itself cause eating disorders. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are complex illnesses with genetic and biologic underpinnings. However, environmental triggers such as narrow or unrealistic body ideals in the media can contribute to increased levels of body dissatisfaction which has been identified as a risk factor for eating disorders.

Dealing with unhealthy media messages is something that almost every man will have to deal with. As is also the case with girls and women, the dangers lie in the drastic steps some boys and men may take to try to manage increasing body image anxiety. Guys who are more dissatisfied with their bodies may be more likely to engage in risky weight loss, bulking or sculpting behaviors such as extremely restrictive diets, cleanses, steroids, supplements or excessive exercise. These are unhealthy and potentially dangerous behaviors for anyone.  However, in boys and men who are genetically at risk for eating disorders, these types of behaviors can set the stage for an eating disorder, triggering changes in the brain, disrupting metabolic functioning, dysregulating hunger/fullness cues and often worsening body image, mood and anxiety symptoms. Boys and men who have a history of trauma, are involved in sports or careers that promote weight loss and perfection, and those with close family members with a history of an eating disorder are also at higher risk for developing one themselves.

Eating disorders have long been miscategorized as purely a women’s issue, even by some healthcare professionals. As a result it’s quite common for major warning signs like excessive exercise or drastic changes to diet to be overlooked or even congratulated in men. Stigma and stereotypes in the eating disorders combine to make it difficult for men who are stuck in the cycle of disordered eating to break out of it and get help. It is suggested that 25-40% of people with eating disorders are men, yet they only make up about 10% of people seeking treatment.

Talking openly about eating disorders can help minimize shame and embarrassment for males struggling with these issues. At The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt, we’ve been treating men with eating disorders for more than twenty-five years and we’re encouraged by the changes we hear in the conversations more recently. More men have been speaking out locally and using national platforms to raise awareness. In just the last year, Zayn Malik of the band One Direction discussed his struggle with an eating disorder and anxiety, performer/songwriter Matthew Koma wrote a poignant blog about his recovery from anorexia, and Joey Julius, a football player at Penn State, made a series of public statements regarding his decision to seek treatment for binge eating disorder. Their messages all point to a resounding hopefulness stemming from the reality that treatment is available and men can heal from their eating disorders and body dissatisfaction.

So what can you do to help the men in your life?

Start by checking in with them. The Let’s Check In campaign is all about empowering individuals, families and communities to talk openly about eating disorders and to strengthen support for individuals of all genders who might feel alone. When it comes to eating disorders, early identification and prompt help-seeking can make a big difference. You can play a role in supporting prevention and recovery from eating disorders simply by educating and preparing yourself.

Know the risk factors and pay attention to any sudden shifts in diet, exercise routine or increased negative comments about themselves or their body. If you’re unsure, the confidential online assessment is a quick tool that can help you gauge whether someone you love might be at risk.  Second, if you are seeing increasing warning signs plan to check in with your friend or loved about your concerns and provide them with compassion and resources.  A fact sheet, conversation guide and additional resources are available at www.letscheckin.com/.


Regis Aguglia, LCSW-C

Written by:
Regis Aguglia, LCSW-C,
Family Therapist at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt
Regis Aguglia earned his Masters in Social Work from the University of Maryland in 2010. Prior to joining The Center for Eating Disorders in 2014, Regis provided individual, family and group therapy in outpatient and school-based settings and gained experience treating individuals struggling with substance abuse. As a Family Therapist in The Center’s inpatient and partial hospital programs, Regis works with families to understand the impact of an eating disorder on the family system and helps to strengthen communication, coping skills, nutritional stability and recovery-focused support. Regis also facilitates a number of inpatient therapy groups including dual diagnosis groups for patients with co-occurring substance abuse and a specialty group for boys and men with eating disorders.

A Conversation with Bailey Webber, Co-Director of THE STUDENT BODY Film – Part 1


Bailey Webber is a student investigative journalist, writer, and co-director of The Student Body. Her story of courage and activism has been featured in numerous newspaper and online articles.  She has been honored by the National Association of University Women for her advocacy work, is an ambassador for the National Eating Disorders Association as well as Proud to Be Me with which she has written several articles, blogs, and has participated in panel discussions. Bailey is the daughter of Michael Webber, a motion picture producer and renowned documentary filmmaker.  As such, she has grown up around movie making and has storytelling in her blood. The Student Body is her directorial debut.

 

In advance of the upcoming Baltimore Premiere of her film, we had the pleasure of asking Bailey about the film and her experience co-directing it alongside her father. Part 1 of here responses are shared here.


Q&A with Bailey Webber – Part 1

 

In your own words, can you tell us what The Student Body is about and why you feel people should see the film?

BW: For me, The Student Body is a story of empowerment and finding your voice.  Learning to stand against something that you feel is wrong, even when nobody else seems to be standing with you.  That’s the example we see in the beginning of the film with my friend, Maddy, which then empowered me to find my own voice, to step outside of my comfort zone, and to combat something that I felt was unjust.  Little did I know the giants I would face along the journey!

I hope people will watch the film for a couple reasons.  For one, I want young people to realize that their opinion does matter, their voice can be powerful, and they can help to bring about change in their world.  But it starts with being willing to learn, to work hard, and to be persistent.  And for adults, I hope they will see the film and learn as I did, that obesity is so much more complicated than we are led to believe, and shaming and blaming kids for this epidemic of obesity is wrong on so many levels. 

I also want people to know that this is a very positive film and it’s even filled with a lot of humor!  People are surprised at how funny and entertaining the film is and they come away from with a sense of hope and encouragement, as well as being better informed and energized about the progress that can be made.  I’ve had both students and adults tell me seeing the film has changed their life!

 

Can you share a little bit about the evolution of The Student Body? What drew you to the topic of BMI report cards and body shaming in the schools?

BW: Believe it or not, this film actually started off as a small, summer project when I was a sophomore in high school.  I wanted to make a documentary about the “fat letters” that were being handed out to students at my school and my dad, who is a filmmaker, agreed to mentor me through the process. 

Early on in my investigation, it became clear that this was more than just a local story, this was happening all over our state.  And by the end of the summer, I found myself in the middle of a heated national debate!  This was much bigger than I could have imagined and I wanted to take my investigation all the way.  So, my dad agreed to drop his other films and help me see this through to the end.  The father/daughter filmmaking duo was born!  I then spent the next two years in production, traveling the country and taking my story to its conclusion. 

I am so thankful to have been able to learn and work alongside my dad.  I had my own obstacles to overcome and I really needed someone like him to give me the confidence and encouragement to keep going all the way.  It was an amazing journey and I learned so much about myself through the experience.   

 

Was there one interview you did for the film that really moved you or was particularly powerful? If so, with whom was it and what made it stand out to you?

BW: As I began investigating this issue I read that these “fat letters” are being sent to students of all ages, even as young as kindergartners. I didn’t know how awful and detrimental this really was to young kids until I talked to them myself.  One of the most powerful interviews I did was with a group of 4th graders in New York who were brave enough to speak on camera.  These sweet little kids each received “fitness grams” from their school, telling them that they were overweight and were devastated by it.  They cried when they got home.  They saw themselves differently than before.  And they were not alone; kids and parents all over the country have had similar experiences but just would not agree to talk about it on camera because it was humiliating.

The short time I spent with these kids changed me forever.  It gave me the energy I needed to keep pressing forward and to be a voice for them and also caused me want to focus my future on working more with youth.

 

What was your personal knowledge/perception of BMI testing in schools before the film and how did it evolve throughout your filming of The Student Body?

BW: One of my favorite things about documentary filmmaking is how much I learn through the journey.  When I started this film I didn’t know much about BMI or obesity.  I simply wanted to tell a personal story about a girl at my school and shed light on what seemed like government profiling and bullying.  But this led me to connect with top experts around the country who were willing to talk to me about BMI and obesity.  I learned so much through this process and the neat thing is the audience gets to come along with me as we take this journey together.

 

Can you share the most surprising thing you learned in the process of creating this film?

BW: The most surprising, and maybe most controversial thing I learned, is that all of the experts that I spoke to said pretty much the same thing – obesity is a disease and the cause in many people may not be as simple as we once believed.  Research is showing that it’s not as simple as calories in versus calories burned and that obesity is not only caused by poor diet and exercise.  The research is finding all of these other factors that play a big role in the obesity epidemic and yet we still are pointing our finger at kids and telling them they have done something wrong.  The experts talked with me about the disconnect between what their research is showing and what the general public believes.


Read Part 2 of our interview with Bailey Webber HERE.

Watch the trailer and reserve a seat at The Baltimore Screening of The Student Body on February 26, 2017 in Towson, MD.

 

 

Body Comparison: An Olympic Sport?


When cheering on the elite athletes at the Rio Olympics and in other high-profile sporting events, it can be easy to lose perspective and you may find yourself comparing your physical body to those at the peak of their sport careers. Lost in these comparisons, we too often become self-critical and forget the long journeys, support communities, financial resources, sacrifices and sheer hard work that comes with being an Olympic athlete.

Olympic bodiesEngaging in body comparison not only hurts you but serves to fuel the overall toxic culture of body shaming. After all, even Olympic athletes are subject to mean-spirited remarks about their appearance. In the most recent summer games, Ethiopian swimmer Nobel Kiros Habte faced some harsh comments for not matching the “look” of his peers, as did Mexican gymnast Alexa Moreno. Many others have faced similar backlash through the years.
Just as athletes are not immune from body shaming, it’s important to remember the “perfect” athletic body does not equate to perfect health. Making snap judgments about someone’s fitness or health based on their appearance is misleading – it’s rarely possible to tell, for example, if someone has an eating disorder just by looking at them. Athletes are not immune to eating disorders or struggles with body image. American cyclist and two-time national champion Mara Abbott has been open about her experience with anorexia. In a candid column for a cycling blog, she reflected on how it affected her performance: “Personally, having taking a hiatus from sport in 2012 due to an eating disorder, I can attest that my thinnest was definitely not my strongest. I really mean that. Please read that sentence more than once.”

As we gather around the television with our friends and families to celebrate athletic achievement, we can support the competitors, ourselves and each other by focusing less on physical appearance and more on the hard work and powerful accomplishments of these world-class athletes.  After all, Olympic bodies can be powerful, graceful, tough and resilient but they are also diverse.  From gymnastics to archery, swimming to shot put, let’s allow our athletes to be inspirations, not because of or in spite of their looks but for the attitude and spirit they project in aiming for their goals.  Let’s enjoy watching all sporting events – whether it’s a World Cup game or a pee wee soccer league – from a place of body appreciation and as part of a body positive summer.

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