Why Providers Must Stand Up and Join the March Against ED

This post was written by our Community Outreach Coordinator as a guest blog for the March against eating disorders.  It was originally posted on marchagainsted.com and has been cross posted here with their permission.


Teacher
Nurse
Barista
Artist
Accountant
Grandmother
Student
CEO
Musician
Author
Mom
News Anchor
Military Officer
College Athlete
Dad

They care for you, entertain you and bring you joy.  They protect you and teach you, create things for you.  They help you and mentor you. They are varied. They are diverse. They are important.

They are people you might see every day.

And they are people we might see every day in the course of providing care and treatment for individuals and families impacted by eating disorders.

MOM March 2014At The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt, we see numerous people each day struggling with anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, ARFID and other feeding and eating disorders.  These individuals with eating disorders are varied.  They are diverse. They are important.

This is why we were proud to participate in the inaugural March Against Eating Disorders on Capitol Hill last fall and why we are eager to return this year on October 27th for an even larger and more impactful event. As physicians, therapists, dietitians and nurses specializing in the treatment of people with eating disorders, we see the daily struggle, the medical repercussions, the fear and the impact of eating disorders on relationships, careers and families.  But we also see the hope, the healing and comfort that comes with treatment and recovery.  That is why it’s so important for those of us in the field to stand up and share our voices too.

Why do we march?  

  • We march because eating disorders continue to be stigmatized, sensationalized, overlooked and underfunded despite having the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.
  • We march because no one chooses to have an eating disorder.  Eating disorders are highly heritable illnesses, meaning 50-80% of a person’s risk for developing an eating disorder is genetic. Additional causes are varied and complex.
  • We march because no family should hear “it’s just a phase, she’ll grow out of it.” from a medical professional before they make it through our doors. A lack of specialized eating disorder training for physicians delays detection and appropriate referrals. Delaying treatment delays recovery.
  • We march because 20-30% of our patients are men who thought they were the “only one” and suffered in silence for a long time. Eating disorders don’t discriminate and treatment shouldn’t either.
  • We march because parents do not cause eating disorders but eating disorders can cause heartache for parents and family members. Guilt, blame, stigma and outdated stereotypes can prevent families from getting the help they deserve. Current research supports an understanding that caregivers can play a positive and integral role in helping a loved one to heal from their eating disorder.
  • We march because eating disorders can be deadly but they can also be overcome.  Early intervention and evidence-based treatment makes a difference.
  • We march because no one should have to get sicker before they can get well. Insurance coverage for eating disorders must not be a barrier to quality care.
  • We march because we live together in a culture that equates weight loss with health, yet we work every day with individuals whose weight loss is associated with osteopenia, hair loss, fatigue, cardiac arrhythmia and infertility.  We support a movement that embraces health-focused goals for our schools and communities instead of weight-focused goals.

These are just some of the reasons why we are excited to stand with The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness, The Eating Disorder Coalition, and MAED – Mothers Against Eating Disorders at The #MarchAgainstED in our nation’s capitol.  Join us on October 27th to take a stand and help increase awareness about eating disorders.

Why will you march?  

Register now at www.MarchAgainstED.com

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Written by Kate Clemmer, LCSW-C, Community Outreach Coordinator at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt for www.MarchAgainstED.com

The original posting of this blog is available at: http://www.marchagainsted.com/blog/why-providers-must-stand-up-and-join-the-march-against-ed

 

Exciting Developments at The Center for Eating Disorders’ Intensive Outpatient Program

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An Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for eating disorders can be important for individuals who are transitioning out of an inpatient or partial hospital setting but would still benefit from more support and structure than is typically offered through weekly outpatient therapy.  The Center for Eating Disorders’  IOP provides 16 hours per week of intensive treatment in the evenings to allow individuals to fully engage in school, work and family during the day while continuing to focus on their recovery.

In the past six months, the IOP has seen some exciting changes and updates in programming. The program has returned to (a newly renovated!) space on the ground floor of the Sheppard Pratt B building, just downstairs from the inpatient and partial hospital units. Our multidisciplinary treatment team now includes members from psychiatry, psychology, art therapy, nutrition, occupational therapy, and social work.

Some of the recent exciting additions to IOP include:

  • Medical DirectorHeather Goff, MD has stepped into the role of Medical Director for the IOP, leading the multidisciplinary treatment team in providing care for patients. She also provides psychiatric treatment to all patients, including weekly assessments and medication management.
  • Clinical CoordinatorMorgan Krumeich, PsyD joined the IOP team in 2014 as our new clinical coordinator. She also leads group therapy and works with patients on an individual basis.
  • Collaborative Care Group – IOP now offers a weekly collaborative care group for parents, caregivers, and supports. Run by IOP social worker Annie Hanley, this group is similar to those offered at other levels of care, but is tailored specifically to the needs and issues that may arise during IOP treatment and associated transitions. All support persons are highly encouraged to attend this free weekly group, held on Tuesdays from 6:30PM-7:30PM.
  • Occupational Therapy – Occupational therapist Rachel Dehart has joined the IOP team and runs weekly OT groups for adults. Adolescents also have the opportunity to meet with an occupational therapist as needed. OT groups in IOP focus on the unique needs of individuals with eating disorders, including time management, grocery shopping, clothes shopping, involvement in the community, work or volunteering, and school.
  • Individualized Nutrition Consultations – With two dietitians now on the IOP team, Caitlin Royster and Kelly Daugherty, we continue to offer weekly nutrition groups for all patients. Additionally, dietitians are working to provide individual assessments and nutrition consultation for patients on a weekly basis.

The Intensive Outpatient Program is designed to work closely with individuals, their families, and outpatient providers in order to offer the most comprehensive care possible. And of course, we always work to incorporate patient feedback in order to ensure the IOP is continuously developing and meeting the needs of individuals, families and the community.

If you have questions about the Intensive Outpatient Program, please call (410) 938-5252 or email EatingDisorderInfo@sheppardpratt.org.

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Meet the IOP Staff

Heather Goff, M.D.
Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist
Medical Director, Intensive Outpatient Program
Dr. Goff joined the Center for Eating Disorders in 2011. A child and adolescent psychiatrist, she is board-certified in both Adult Psychiatry and Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, providing her a developmental perspective that enhances her work with patients of all ages. Her initial medical training was at New York Medical College, followed by a residency in Adult Psychiatry at Yale University, where she was a chief resident in 2005-2006. She then went on to complete a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center, where she was again chosen to be a chief resident in 2007-2008. Upon completion of her post-graduate training, Dr. Goff joined the Yale faculty, with joint appointments in the Department of Psychiatry and the Child Study Center. As a clinician-educator, she was the teaching attending for one of the adolescent inpatient units. She also served as Director of the Child Study Center at Madison, where she provided direct outpatient care to children, adolescents and their families. While at Yale, Dr. Goff was also a fellow at the Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Public Policy, leading to her interest in the intersection of the media and social policy in the development and treatment of eating disorders. In her role at CED, Dr. Goff spent one year treating individuals in the inpatient and the partial hospital programs. In 2012, she transitioned to a new role as Medical Director of the Center’s Intensive Outpatient Program and is also completing assessments and evaluations for children and adolescents in our outpatient department.

Erin Birely, LGPC
Mental Health Counselor
Erin Birely graduated from Loyola University in Maryland in 2012 with a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology. She completed a year of internship at the Center for Eating Disorders from 2011-2012, and subsequently began working full time in 2012. She is currently working towards her LCPC certification. Erin provides individual check ins and goal setting with patients. Additionally she facilitates DBT groups focusing on symptom management and emotion regulation, and IPT groups focusing on processing interpersonal difficulties, as well as leading the Multi-Family and Supports Group on Wednesdays.

Kelly Daugherty, RD, LDN
Clinical Dietitian
Kelly Daugherty received her Bachelor of Science degree in Dietetics from Saint Catherine University in Minnesota. She completed her dietetic internship with an emphasis in clinical nutrition at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, MD. During this internship, Kelly completed rotations on an acute care eating disorder unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and at the Center for Eating Disorders. Kelly joined the CED team in November 2014. She completes nutrition assessments, teaches nutrition groups and assists patients with menu planning in the inpatient, partial hospital, and intensive outpatient programs.

Caitlin Royster, RD, LDN
Clinical Dietitian
Caitlin Royster received her Bachelors of Science in Nutritional Sciences with a concentration in Dietetics from Cornell University. She completed her dietetic internship with a focus on clinical nutrition and nutrition research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. Caitlin joined the Center for Eating Disorders in July 2014. Here she conducts nutrition assessments, teaches nutrition groups, and assists patients with meal planning in the inpatient, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient programs. Prior to joining the Center for Eating Disorders, Caitlin worked in an acute care setting providing medical nutrition therapy and nutrition education to patients. Caitlin is passionate about neutralizing food for her patients and takes a non-diet approach to nutrition education.

Rachel Dehart MS, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist II
Rachel Dehart graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Public & Community Health from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2007. She received her Master of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy from Towson University in 2010. Rachel is currently an occupational therapist on the Children’s Short-Term Inpatient Unit where she adapts and grades activities to meet various physical, emotional, and cognitive levels of children aged 3-12. Rachel facilitates Life Skills and Time Management occupational therapy groups in the CED Intensive Outpatient Program to assist patients with re-engagement in meaningful occupations at home and within the community.

Annie Hanley, LGSW
Family Therapist
Annie Hanley graduated from University of South Carolina with a Masters of Social Work in 2014. She is currently certified as a Licensed Graduate Social Worker and is working towards her LCSW-C licensure. Prior to joining the Center for Eating Disorders, Annie provided individual and family therapy at an eating disorder treatment center at both the inpatient and outpatient levels of care. She also has experience using the Trauma-Focused CBT model to work with children who have experienced trauma. In her current role, Annie works as a family therapist in the inpatient, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient levels of care. She also facilitates groups in the intensive outpatient program (IOP), including the Tuesday IOP Collaborative Care group for family members and support people. Her past research includes examining the role of peer influence on eating disorder development.

Brianna Garrold, ATR
Clinical Art Therapist
Brianna Garrold received her BA in Fine Arts from Notre Dame of Maryland University in 2010 (formerly College of Notre Dame of Maryland) and her MA from The George Washington University in Art Therapy in 2012, with additional coursework in counseling and Trauma-Informed Care. Currently, Brianna works with inpatient, partial hospitalization, and Intensive Outpatient Program patients using the art process to help patients identify and express their emotions, manage anxiety, and treat body image distortions. Brianna received her ATR in September 2014, and is currently working towards completing the LCPC, and the LCPAT, Licensed Clinical Professional Art Therapist.

Morgan Krumeich, Psy.D.
Clinical Coordinator, Intensive Outpatient Program
Dr. Morgan Krumeich graduated from The George Washington University in 2014 with her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. Prior to obtaining her doctoral degree, Dr. Krumeich obtained a Masters in Clinical Psychology from The George Washington University as well as a Masters in Education (specializing in Applied Child Studies) from Vanderbilt University. She previously spent two years at Sheppard Pratt as a psychology extern at The Lodge School, where she conducted individual therapy, in addition to co-leading group and family therapy. Dr. Krumeich completed a year of internship as a school psychologist in the Newark Public School System before returning to Sheppard Pratt in 2014 to become Clinical Coordinator at the Center for Eating Disorders Intensive Outpatient Program. Dr. Krumeich has specialized training in working with children and adolescents, but she has experience (and enjoys!) working with individuals of all ages.

 

Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: 3 Important Considerations

 

Family-Based Treatment (FBT) is an important evidence-based treatment for anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Originally conceived at the Maudsley Hospital in London, and often referred to as the Maudsley Model, it was further developed by James Lock, MD, PhD and Daniel le Grange, PhD in the United States. FBT is an intensive outpatient treatment involving the entire family whereby parents play a primary and critical role in all of the following tasks:

  • managing the restoration of the child’s weight to a healthy place and supporting the blockade of eating disordered behaviors
  • helping the child to re-establish age-appropriate control and management over their own eating
  • re-focusing the family on healthy adolescent development and relationships separate from the eating disorder

FBT is a highly focused treatment that is presented in three stages. It emphasizes behavioral change and supports a gradual increase in autonomy for the adolescent.  As a psychologist who supports and guides families through this treatment, I thought that it might be helpful for those who are considering FBT to have a primer for the treatment. In thinking about what may be helpful to be aware of when considering FBT, I reflected on the first session I have with each family and thought about all of the crucial messages I try to convey during that time. Below, I’ve decided to share the three messages that, in my perspective, stand as the most important tenets of understanding and implementing FBT.

  1. For adolescents struggling with anorexia nervosa, family support can be the most effective tool for making change. At its core, FBT recognizes that parents are capable of helping their child recover and the therapist’s role is to support them in this goal. When a child is confronted with any serious crisis or illness, investment and nurturing from the family is considered a critical asset and anorexia nervosa is no exception to this. Despite lingering misconceptions about a parental role in the development of eating disorders, FBT is built on the knowledge that parents do not cause eating disorders and that they are, in fact, integral to the recovery process. It is our job as therapists to recognize the strengths and qualities of each family and consider how FBT can be applied within each unique family system. Simply put, the aim of FBT is to empower parents to help their child overcome the eating disorder.  In other words, the therapist serves as a consultant who joins with families as they apply skills they already possess. 
  2. Eating disorders have genetic and biological underpinnings.  As such, adolescents with anorexia nervosa have little control over their illness. Furthermore, periods of malnutrition and starvation can trigger a self-perpetuating cycle of anorexic symptoms that can cause considerable disruption and suffering for the whole family. But to be clear, it is the eating disorder, not the child, which has caused such an interruption in life.  Anorexia nervosa is a devastating illness, the biological, physiological and psychological consequences of which can cause individuals to think and behave in self-destructive ways. It is important that the family works together as a team to help fight the illness and to keep it from embedding further in their child’s life. FBT therapists assist parents in distinguishing between their child and their child’s illness. This distinction helps the family to avoid blaming the child for disruption and stress that is actually a result of the illness, and also makes it easier for parents to take action when they realize they can nurture their child while simultaneously battling against the illness. As a result, energy can be better spent fighting the anorexia, not fighting with their child who is likely already suffering a great deal.
  3. Because of #1 and #2, FBT requires serious hard work and commitment. I am very upfront with families involved in FBT that they will be their child’s primary support AND that eating disorders are insidious and overwhelming illnesses. FBT is not easy. Fighting a devastating illness that has convinced your loved one they are not sick and that they don’t need help, is going to be a lot of hard work. And while it can be grueling, it is also worth it. When we hosted author Harriet Brown as a guest speaker in 2010, we asked her to share her family’s experience in doing FBT with her daughter, and she spoke to this difficulty and to the benefits of this tenet:When we took on FBT, we took on both the responsibility and the power to intervene. That was a tremendously liberating step. The worst part of my daughter’s illness for me was standing by helplessly, watching her suffer and starve. The notion that my husband and I could help her required a huge mental paradigm shift—but once we made it, we were much more effective.” 

In the beginning, FBT will require a lot of energy- energy to monitor your child’s behaviors, energy to learn different behavioral responses, energy to deal with the emotional and interpersonal changes that may come about through this work. I warn my families about the commitment that it takes and I’m honest about the dedication needed. But I also talk to families about the benefits of short-term work to outweigh the devastating long-term effects of an eating disorder and I share with them the facts.  I talk to them about the serious and significant risks of anorexia- physically, emotionally, cognitively- and I have found that families most often agree that avoiding these risks is worth putting in the work. I tell them that FBT has been shown in research (and in my office) to be the most efficacious treatment for adolescents with anorexia that we know about today.

After committing to and sticking with the treatment, I see families eventually begin to talk about “having [their] child back.” I hear families talk about their child’s increased energy, sense of humor returning, interest in friendships again, and reestablishment in the family. I hear the satisfaction when parents talk about receiving feedback from others who approach them just to say that they have recognized a positive change in their child. Over time, I hear families talk about feeling confident that they helped their child recover. They share that they can once again trust their child to make healthy food choices, and they feel a sense of relief that they no longer have to live with the constant presence of the illness. I hear families tell me that the “fight” with the eating disorder gets easier and less demanding, and eventually they don’t need to engage in the battle at all. 

If you think your family member, or someone you know may benefit from family-based treatment, I would recommend starting by talking to a professional about this option, either your current treatment provider or, if you are not currently in treatment, finding a family therapist who is trained specifically in FBT. The Center for Eating Disorders has several FBT therapists in our outpatient department, and we are happy to answer any questions you may have about this treatment modality. You can email us at EatingDisorderInfo@sheppardpratt.org or call (410) 938-5252. Additionally, we encourage all of the families we work with to utilize the book, Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder (Lock & Le Grange, 2005) as an educational and supportive resource throughout the FBT process. You can also access an extensive selection of journal articles regarding clinical research on FBT courtesy of Maudsley Parents organization.

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 Written by Laura Sproch, PhD
Individual and Family Therapist
The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt

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New Collaborative Care Programs for parents, caregivers and loved ones

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt has long urged the participation and inclusion of family members in the treatment process for both adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.  In addition to all of our family treatment components, parents and family members have been able to access our community support group as well as a weekly family psychoeducation group.  We are excited to announce that, beginning in July 2012, family members and caregivers of our patients will be provided with an additional level of support and engagement in the recovery process.

The Collaborative Care Workshops are designed to help provide education and support for the friends and family members who are most central to the patient’s recovery process.

Building from the strengths of the family based model, Janet Treasure and her colleagues have developed a series of workshops for caregivers of loved ones who have been diagnosed with eating disorders as a way of meeting the needs of the carers.  The workshops are designed to educate carers on the key skills that clinicians have in treating eating disorders so that there is more continuity in care between the treatment setting and at home. The workshops are designed to address the most universal needs of the carers: connection with other carers; support; and skills training. Sessions reflect an adult learning modality in which skills are taught and then there is ample time for participants to practice these skills experientially. Key skills taught include motivational interviewing, communication, the trans-theoretical model of change, self-care and behavior analysis. Research suggests that participation in these workshops, leads to benefits for both the carers and the patient. (Treasure, Sepulveda, Whitaker, Todd and Lopez).

 ~ Outpatient Collaborative Care Workshops at CED ~

The 6-week Collaborative Care workshop series will be offered to parents, significant others and primary caregivers of individuals who are stepping down from our higher levels of care (inpatient or partial hospital programs). Typically, participation in the workshop series will begin the week following a loved one’s discharge from the eating disorder unit.  [UPDATE: As of July 2013, CC Workshops are open to all family members and support people during any stage of a loved one’s treatment and recovery.] Participation in the program will provide caregivers with the following resources, skills and opportunities:

  1. Provide basic eating disorder education, including current research findings about treatment recommendations, course of illness and treatment, prognosis, and basic understanding of how eating disorders are maintained.
  2. Define and recognize symptom substitution behaviors and strategies for managing these should they arise.
  3. Analyze carer needs and learning to implement self-care strategies, including mindfulness techniques.
  4. Learn effective communication skills to improve communication with their loved one who has an eating disorder.
  5. Recognize caregiver styles and learning to maximize strengths while working towards the most effective caregiver style.
  6. Define the different stages of change in the trans-theoretical model of change and understand how these stages can impact a loved one’s motivation throughout the treatment process.
  7. Learn how to help increase their loved one’s motivation towards recovery.
  8. Improve emotional intelligence by learning basic emotion regulation skills.
  9. Learn the basic theoretical model of cognitive behavioral therapy, as well as basic CBT techniques.
  10. Learn how to analyze how caregiver behaviors may inadvertently contribute to the maintenance of eating disorder behaviors in the family context.

Additionally, caregivers will learn about the interventions most commonly used by the Center for Eating Disorders.  Providing carers with education on the basic theoretical underpinnings of cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy will ensure that carers understand the skills that their loved ones have been taught in treatment. This will allow carers to be more fully able to support their loved one in attempts to challenge and/or block eating disorder cognitions and behaviors when they are at home. For more information about this program please email the Collaborative Care group facilitator, jmoran@sheppardpratt.org.

The Center for Eating Disorders has also added a 4-weekend Collaborative Care workshop series exclusively for family members  of current CED inpatients and partial hospital patients.  Please call us at (410) 938-5252 for more information.

Visit our website: www.eatingdisorder.org

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 References & Additional Resources:

Lock, J; Couturier, J; and Agras, W.S. (2006)Comparison of long-term outcomes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa treated with family therapy. Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(6), 66-72.

Lock, J.; Le Grange, D.; Agras, W.S. and Dare, C. (2001) Treatment Manual for Anorexia Nervosa: A Family Based Approach. New York: Guilford.

Silverman, J. Anorexia Nervosa: Historical Perspective on Treament (1997). In D.M. Garner & P.E. Garfinkel (Eds), Handbook of treatment for eating disorders, 2nd edition(pp 3-10) New York: Guilford Press.

Treasure, J., Schmidt, U. & Macdonald, P. (Eds). (2010) The Clinician’s Guide to Collaborative Caring in Eating Disorders: The New Maudsley Method. New York: Routledge.

Treasure, J., Sepulveda, A., Whitaker, W., Todd, G. & Lopez, C. (2010) Family and Carer workshops. In Treasure, J., Schmidt, U. & Macdonald, P. (Eds). (2010) The Clinician’s Guide to Collaborative Caring in Eating Disorders: The New Maudsley Method.(pp167-173) New York: Routledge.

Treasure, J.; Smith, G.; and Crane. A. (2007) Skills-based learning for caring for a loved one with an eating disorder: The new Maudsley method. New York: Routledge.

When Someone You Love Has an Eating Disorder

CED LeafThis is a special blog in advance National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (Feb 26th – March 3rd) and an upcoming free workshop, When Your Loved One has an Eating Disorder: Helping Them Heal on the Road to Recovery. You can find details about all of our upcoming NEDAWeek events at the end of the post.

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Guilt.  Shame.  Frustration.  Sadness.  Fear.  Anger.  These are just some of the emotions commonly experienced and expressed by support people when someone they love is struggling with an eating disorder (ED).  While each family experiences an ED, and the recovery process, in a unique way, there can be some commonalities that are important to talk about. Attending support groups, information sessions, and community workshops facilitated by treatment professionals are all great ways for support people to gain understanding and insight into the difficult journey their loved one is on.  It’s also a great way for family and friends to get feedback and support around their own feelings while they help their loved one navigate their way back to health.   A few of the most common struggles faced by family members are discussed below.    

Often times, parents and caregivers feel guilty and express concern that they may be to blame for their loved one’s eating disorder.

It can be terrifying for caregivers to find out that their loved one has an ED, especially as they begin to understand the level of suffering that comes with that.  A common reaction among parents is self-blame or intense guilt over the possibility that they may have contributed to their daughter’s or son’s illness.  This guilt can understandably create resistance or defensiveness and can be paralyzing for loved ones in the treatment process.  As long as the focus remains on “It’s all my fault.” it can be difficult to move towards “How can we as a family work together to support our loved one’s recovery?” 

While these illnesses have a complex combination of contributing factors, research has found them to be highly heritable, meaning 50-80% of one’s risk for developing an ED is dependent upon genetic factors. It’s important for families to receive reassurance that they are not to blame for their loved one’s illness while understanding that there are important ways they can help in the recovery process.  In fact, evidence-based treatment of EDs suggests educating family members and involving them in the treatment process greatly improves outcomes.  By identifying ways in which the ED has affected the family functioning and discussing dynamics that may be maintaining some of the person’s symptoms, families can work together towards improved communication, positive interactions and healing that extends far beyond the eating disorder.

Support people often feel anxious or frustrated about what to say vs. what not to say to a loved one with an eating disorder.  This can lead to fear that they are making their loved one worse because they don’t know how to respond in difficult situations involving food or body image.  Support people report that they often feel that they are “walking on eggshells” around their friend or family member with the eating disorder.

One of the most common examples of this dilemma occurs during the recovery process when support people may say something like “You look so much healthier,” but it is interpreted as “You look fat”.  Anyone who has been through an ED will tell you that they often feel irritable, and so much of their energy and time is spent thinking about weight and food that most comments people make about their appearance will automatically be construed in a negative way, even when they come from a place of care and concern.  Alternative comments that may be easier for your loved one to hear as they recover might be, “I’ve noticed you have a lot more energy lately” or “It is so nice to see you smiling today.”  One of the most helpful things support people can do is to communicate with their loved one by asking for a specific list of things that they can say or do that would be helpful to them when they are struggling.  Examples of things that are triggering or are not helpful to recovery could be useful as well.  Keep in mind that these lists may change at various points in the recovery process; communicate and revise often.

Also important to note: supporting someone through recovery from an ED is uniquely difficult compared to some other illnesses because of the cultural environment we live in.  Our society encourages and applauds hyper vigilance around weight, food and perfection yet recovery from an ED involves giving up some level of control over all three of those things.  Learning to filter unhelpful information and help your loved one resist damaging cultural messages about weight/food can feel like an uphill battle.  However, it does get easier with continued education about media literacy and guidance from therapists and registered dietitians who specialize in treating individuals with EDs.    

Support people are often so worried about the individual with the eating disorder that they focus 100% their energy on their loved one’s safety and recovery.   It becomes very easy to forget to seek their own support, neglect to keep up with their own self-care or let other personal priorities fall to the wayside. This can lead to mounting  feelings of exhaustion, depression or hopelessness.

Helping a loved one through the process of recovery from an ED can feel all-encompassing, especially when it’s your child or a spouse.   It often must become the family’s priority to get them back to a place of safety and stability, both physically and mentally.  However, support people can only offer stable, strong support when they are caring for themselves and staying stable, strong and rested themselves.  It’s important for caregivers to stay connected to their own friends, to seek out their own support and to set aside time to replenish themselves emotionally.  It could be as simple as sending a quick email to a friend every night before bed or scheduling a day trip to a favorite place. Whatever it is, remember the advice you get when you fly…you have to put on your own oxygen mask before you can effectively help those around you.

The truth is recovery can be a challenging process for all involved.  Even as progress is made, there are often set-backs or plateaus that can be confusing and frustrating .   Can you relate to the experiences discussed above?  Did you encounter other difficulties and roadblocks while learning to support a loved one in recovery?  Leave us a comment below or join in the discussion on our Facebook page.

At the Center for Eating Disorders, we recognize that there is a special need for education and support for the supporters themselves.  When Your Loved One Has an Eating Disorder: Helping Them Heal on the Road to Recovery is a FREE workshop designed to help family members and friends receive specialized education about EDs and their treatment, as well as insight into various care giving tools that can help facilitate the recovery process. Check out the details below, and don’t forget to RSVP by calling (410) 427-3886.

MARCH 1st, 2012  ~ When Your Loved One Has an Eating Disorder: Helping Them Heal on the Road to Recovery [download the event flyer]7:00 – 8:30 pm in  Baltimore, MD

 

 

Visit our Events Page for a full listing of upcoming events, including our NEDAWeek kick-off event, Invisible Victory: An Athlete’s Story of Hope & Triumph in Eating Disorder Recovery.

 

Invisible Victory

 

 

 www.eatingdisorder.org

Support for Parents & Families: Navigating the World of Eating Disorder Treatment & Recovery

Join us on Thursday February 24th, 2011  to hear from a panel of parents who’ve been through the treatment process in various forms with their own children.  Listen to their stories and join the conversation during a special Q/A with the panel members and several treatment specialists from CED. You can read more about the event and meet our panel members below, then download the Event Flyer or visit our website to register for this free event.

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For someone with an eating disorder, the positive role of the family in the recovery process cannot be underestimated.  Parents, spouses, siblings and close support people can make a world of difference for someone who is struggling with an eating disorder, especially as they work towards recovery.  But its not easy.  It takes a lot of patience and presents many challenges for parents and support people who have never before been forced to learn about the complexities of an eating disorder or navigate the world of treatment. Just as the individual with the disorder experiences intense fears, personal hardships, and emotional angst throughout the illness and recovery, so too do those who support them.  It can be torturous to have an eating disorder but in many ways, it can be just as difficult to care deeply for someone who does.

Parents in particular, despite the age of their son or daughter with an eating disorder, can be met with incredible fear, stress and frustration as they try to weed through a completely new landscape of physical and mental health complications, what to say and what not to say to someone in treatment, and how to respond to irritability, refusal to get treatment, or general isolation from the rest of the family.  And while each family has their own unique experience, two things are very common when approaching the recovery process with a loved one:  1) you will have a lot of questions, and 2) you may feel very alone.  That being said, it can be very beneficial to talk with other families who understand what you’re going through and can offer knowledgeable, experienced support.

This year, in honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt will be hosting a Panel Presentation and Q/A event featuring parents who’ve experienced the difficult job of supporting a loved one with an eating disorder.  This free event is designed to create a safe place for families and support people to gather, ask questions and seek feedback from those who’ve been in the trenches themselves.  The panel will also include specialists from the Center for Eating Disorders who will answer questions about the treatment process, types of therapy, health and medical concerns,  nutrition issues, and all things affecting recovery.

All of the parent panel members come to the table with different experiences, different strengths and different outcomes but they all have an important story to tell and a hopeful message to share.   If you have questions about supporting a loved one, or you would just like to listen and know that you are not alone, please join us for this special event in Baltimore on Thursday February 24th at 7:00 pm.

~  MEET The PANEL ~

PARENT & FAMILY Panel Members:

Jane Cawley – Jane and her family helped her daughter, then age fourteen, recover from anorexia nervosa with family-based treatment in 2004. Ever since, she’s worked tirelessly as an advocate for eating disorders, actively helping parents find and better understand information on eating disorders and the treatments available.  She co-chairs Maudsley Parents and serves on the steering committee of NEDA’s Parent, Family, and Friends Network.  She was also recently interviewed for a PsychCentral blog entitled, What Parents Need to Know About Eating Disorders: Q&A with Jane Cawley

Katherine BloomKatherine is the loving mother of Kira Bloom, who lost her struggle with bulimia nervosa on May 21, 2009 at age twenty-five.  Katherine now speaks out to honor her daughter’s memory, the importance of treatment and to share what she has learned in hopes of sparing another family a similar tragedy.

Jean R. – Jean and her family learned to navigate the world of eating disorders when their daughter was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa in 2000.  Through their daughter’s journey they became acquainted with an ANAD support group, and in the spring of 2007, she volunteered to be on the Eating Disorder Network of Maryland board.  Jean has also been involved with Supporting Each Other, a support group for family members and friends of those who have loved ones struggling with disordered eating.  As an educator, Jean sees the importance of education to spread awareness and understanding about this dangerous disease.

TREATMENT SPECIALIST Panel Members:

Steven Crawford, MD – Dr. Steven Crawford is a board certified psychiatrist and Associate Director of The Center for Eating Disorders.  Dr. Crawford has spent over 20 years devoted to the treatment of individuals and families impacted by eating disorders.  He remains committed to providing the best possible treatment for every patient at CED, ensuring a comprehensive continuum of care, state-of-the-art programs and a staff of highly qualified, specialty trained practitioners.  Dr. Crawford also serves on the faculty at the University of Maryland where he trains medical students on prevention, identification, early intervention and evidence-based treatment for eating disorders.

Dina Wientge, LCSW-C – Dina Wientge has been a part of the CED staff for more than 14 years. She received her Masters in social work from the University of Maryland and trained at Johns Hopkins University .  Dina provides family therapy for patients in CED’s inpatient program and oversees all aspects of the Center’s family therapy programming.   She is one of a select group of clinicians from across the country who have been specially trained and certified to provide Family Based Treatment (FBT) for eating disorders.

Debbi Jacobs, LCSW-C – Debbi Jacobs earned her MSW from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Social Work in 1999.  Prior to joining the team at The Center for Eating Disorders, she provided individual, couples and family therapy at the Jewish Family Services in Baltimore with a particular interest in trauma and loss.  Debbi currently provides individual and family therapy at CED’s outpatient department with a concentration in providing support for families engaged in the Maudsley method of re-feeding.

Samantha Lewandowski, MS, RD, LDN – Samantha Lewandowski received her BS in Nutrition from the University of Delaware and her Masters in Health Promotion Management from The American University.  Samantha, a Registered Dietitian, joined the CED staff in 2006, and her main role is working on nutritional goals with patients and their families in the outpatient setting.  As Nutritional Care Coordinator, she also supervises the outpatient nutrition staff, coordinates nutrition programs and provides community workshops and professional trainings on the prevention and treatment of eating disorders.

All family members, support people and health/mental health professionals are welcome to attend.  Download the Event Flyer or visit our Events Page to pre-register and reserve a seat.

If you have questions about this panel or any of our other NEDAWeek events, please call The Center for Eating Disorders’ Outreach Coordinator at (410) 427-3886.