The Center for Eating Disorders Blog

NEDA Walk: There are many ways to make a difference


Despite their increasing prevalence, eating disorders receive significantly less funding than other major mental illnesses, and a lot of misinformation still exists about who is impacted and just how serious eating disorders can be. As treatment providers we know that for every person who walks through our doors and receives treatment, many others never get the help they need. We are participating in a NEDA Walk this year to try to help change that. As NEDA shares on their website, there are 30 million great reasons to participate in a walk. If you’re wondering why you should walk, consider the following.

To help raise awareness & restore hope…
Eating disorders are widely misunderstood illnesses, and old stereotypes and myths often prevent people from seeking help. Help fight stigma and shine a light on eating disorders as a serious public health issue.

To help save lives…
Eating disorders are associated with many different short-term and long-term health consequences, some of which are very serious and others that can be fatal. By participating in the NEDA Walk, you’ll be raising funds that support life-saving programs, advocacy efforts, and research initiatives.

To feel less alone…
Eating disorders can be extremely isolating illnesses. When you’re struggling or supporting a loved one with an eating disorder, it’s easy to feel like you’re the only one in the world who is going through it but we promise, you’re not. Participating in a NEDA Walk is a great way to come together as a recovery-focused group and engage as a community in positive change.

While there are countless reasons to participate in a Walk, it’s also extremely important to consider that there may be reasons not to walk too. Given that eating disorders often involve energy deficits and an unhealthy relationship with exercise, it’s important to remind potential walkers that your safety and recovery always need to come first.

Typical NEDA walks are 1- 2 miles in distance but for someone with an eating disorder, significant movement or walking – even a short distance – could be unsafe or contrary to treatment goals. Definitely check in with your treatment providers prior to participation if you’re having any of these symptoms:

  • recent fatigue, weakness or dizziness
  • episodes of fainting, falling or near falls (tripping) in past month
  • muscle cramps, numbness or paresthesia’s (limb falling asleep) in your extremities
  • recent dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities
  • inability to complete a meal without acting on symptoms the morning of the walk

Furthermore, even if you haven’t had the physical symptoms listed above, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is your motivation to attend the walk driven primarily by a desire to engage in exercise?
  • Have your thoughts about the walk included calculations of distances, steps, calories, etc.?
  • Do your current treatment goals include taking a break from exercise or restrictions on movement?

If the answer to any of those questions is yes, be sure to set parameters with your treatment team around the best and safest way for you to participate. For example, it is important to remember that you can attend a NEDA Walk without doing the walk portion of the event! Bring a lawn chair, listen to the keynote speakers, and cheer on your team. You can also bring a buddy who can help you stay focused on the important aspects of the walk and who can help ensure you’re well-fueled before the event, symptom-free during the event and full of hope throughout the day.

Lastly, it’s 100% OKAY if you can’t attend a walk right now because you’re taking care of yourself. Sometimes self-care means saying no to some things so you can say yes to treatment or recovery. You can always participate by sharing about the cause online – or – use the event day as a catalyst for your own recovery. Locate a local support group, read a book about recovery, or make that call to a therapist you’ve been putting off.

However you choose to participate, remember that you are worth it and you are not alone.

………………

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt will be joining NEDA and a host of other eating disorder and body image organizations for the Baltimore NEDA Walk on September 30 at Goucher College. Find out more here.