The Center for Eating Disorders Blog

32 Ways to Stay Recovery-Focused During a Snow Storm

If you are one of the many people on the east coast dealing with this most recent winter storm, you might be struggling to cope with loneliness, boredom or the stress of being stuck at home in heavy snow and cold temperatures. Snow days can certainly be fun but they can also present some challenges for individuals who struggle with mental health issues and eating disorders in particular. That’s why we put together this list of activities and strategies for maintaining a recovery-focused snow day. You can print or bookmark this post and refer back as need for coping skills and ideas for staying recovery-oriented on any unexpected days off throughout the year.


32 Recovery-Focused Activities, Tips & Strategies:

  1. First things first. Review what food you have available and write down a plan for your remaining meals and snacks for the day that is aligned with recommendations from your treatment providers. Post your plan in the kitchen or somewhere you will see it throughout the day. Set up reminders to take the breaks you need to prepare and eat each meal.
  2. Call or text a friend to check-in. 
  3. Paint something.
  4. Start a new knitting or craft project. 
  5. Read an old book that you loved the first time around.
  6. Record your observations about the storm in a journal.
  7. FaceTime with a family member that might be feeling lonely in the storm.
  8. Try this breathing exercise.
  9. Catch up on THANK YOU cards. 
  10. Watch funny videos on YouTube.
  11. Create a gratitude list and add to it throughout the snow storm. When the storm is over, hang it up somewhere where you can admire it and refer back to it.
  12. If you know you tend to get sucked in to social comparisons, limit your time on social media to specific hours each day. Block or hide accounts that you notice only leave you feeling negatively. Follow one or two new accounts that are #bodypositive or recovery-focused. We recommend @NEDAstaff, @LindaBaconHAES and @MelissaDToler to get started.
  13. Look up and print information about eating disorder support groups in your area and make plans to attend once the roads are cleared. Add it to your calendar with an alert so you don’t forget.
  14. Challenge your perfectionism. Do something in a mediocre way and be okay with it. If you don’t consider yourself an artist, it’s okay. Just grab a pencil and start sketching or start tearing up some old magazines for a collage project and get to work. Accept imperfection. Celebrate imperfection.
  15. Make a snow day music playlist full of upbeat classics that warm your heart. 
  16. Go through your closet and gather old or uncooperative clothes that are not serving you or your recovery. Bag them up and get them ready to donate when the snow clears.
  17. Do research on countries and tourist attractions you might like to visit someday.
  18. If you’re an essential employee and need to be at work during the storm, remember that your well-being is also essential. Be assertive about your need for meals, breaks and sleep. 
  19. Throw in a load of laundry you’ve been putting off. When it comes out of the dryer, fold it right away. It’s a great way to keep your hands busy and it’ll be warm too.
  20. Watch a favorite movie and just be present with the movie instead of being on your computer or phone at the same time.
  21. If you’re feeling like the walls are closing in on you, get bundled up and check on elderly neighbors.
  22. Listen to the snow falling and do a 3-minute mindfulness exercise.
  23. Have LEGOs and/or kids in the house? Invite your kids to build something with you.
  24. Send a picture of yourself smiling to someone who has been having a rough time and might need a smile.
  25. Water all of your indoor plants
  26. Drink some hot tea and read the paper
  27. Once the snow passes, put on your boots, explore the outdoors and take some photos; look for people and animal tracks in the snow.
  28. Do a puzzle.
  29. Make a list of compliments you’ve received in the past and honor them, even if you couldn’t accept or believe them at the time they were given.
  30. Make plans for next week. Schedule a meal with a supportive friend or buy tickets online for a show or event you’d like to see.
  31. Make a meal plan and grocery shopping list for the coming week. Email it to a dietitian or therapist on your treatment team.
  32. Don’t have a treatment team?  Call (410) 938-5252 for a free phone assessment and to be connected with an Intake Coordinator at The Center for Eating Disorders who can talk with you about available options.

What else would you add to the list? How are you planning to make your snow day more memorable and recovery-focused? Share your ideas with us on Facebook and Twitter.


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