The Center for Eating Disorders Blog

Connecting with EMME on Body Image, Beauty and Balance…

 

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt is gearing up for a week of free community events in recognition of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week 2013.  To help us kick things off, supermodel and positive body image advocate, Emme will provide a special keynote presentation in Baltimore entitled “Connecting BODY+MIND+SPIRIT” on February 24th, 2013. In advance of this free event, we asked Emme to share her unique insights into the current cultural ideals regarding beauty and to comment on some of the key elements that have helped her establish a positive, balanced relationship with her body, mind and spirit throughout her career.

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 Q & A with Emme Aronson:

Q: Through your development of EmmeNation and your role as an Ambassador for the National Eating Disorder Association, you have become a powerful advocate for positive body image. What does the term body image mean to you and how did it come to be such a significant part of your overall message of self-acceptance?

Emme: Body image is the framework for the house where our soul resides. If the foundation is weak, the house crumbles and the soul cannot fully exhibit its magnificence. How we live day-to-day depends on whether or not we have a connective or disassociated connection with our soul and our body.

Often we live from the neck up in a constant, not fully self-accepting state so to speak. By not breaking this chain of self loathing, body bashing, and guilt, dis-ease within one’s self grows and negativity cycles infinitum. At the same time a select few get richer at the cost of millions being diseased or disconnected each day, even each hour if engaging in large doses of media/TV.

It has always been my opinion that only by taking responsibility for one’s health and well-being of the mind, body and spirit, all parts moving in unison together as a befriended system, will we ever be set free from the onslaught of purely capitalistic influences. Our vitality of health, not to mention our culture and the imminent sustainability of our environment,depends on this effort.

Q: What would you say are some of the biggest pressures facing women and girls today that impact the way they experience their bodies and their inner selves?

Emme: I feel it’s the “capitalism-at-all-costs” mentality which, sadly, gets carried on the backs of women starting at an early age. This constant reminder of inadequacy plants insecurity where there once was none, or the seeds may get passed down generationally from mothers to daughters. With the hypersexualized advertising culture in full swing today, these dormant seeds are watered and the negative impact on body image, self-esteem, goal setting, visualization, and accomplishments rolls on, eroding the cornerstone of our society – women and children.

Q: What has your modeling career taught you about your relationship with your body?

Emme: Coming from a news media background, I immediately saw the lack of body diversity in the reporting of beauty. The story was loud and clear that natural body diversity was not to be discussed in mainstream media, and if it was, you were not to highlight it or shoot beautiful, size diverse models side-by-side. This was due to pressures caused by astounding amounts of money being dumped into diet related advertising (based on products with a 98% failure rate). The diet industry today probably makes well over a hundred billion dollars a year. (Psychology Today stated 50 billion in 1997, up from 30 billion in 1987). Understandably, a conflict of interest precedes that kind of money, especially when in uninformed hands. So its my job, and the job of other NEDA ambassadors, to reach out to the media as best we can to share best practices in reporting on body and eating related issues via the protocol presented to networks, women’s magazines and online outlets. An informed media gives them the opportunity to do good and make a choice, which is the best case scenario.

Q: The fashion and beauty industries often receive a lot of criticism for the role they play in pressuring women (and men) to look better, thinner, different, “perfect”, etc. How have you managed to balance your interests in fashion and beauty with your message of self-acceptance and inner beauty.

Emme: Having regularly been involved in the beauty, fashion, TV and clothing industries during different parts of my 20+ year career, I work on maintaining a balance between all the influences. I’m sure I have ruffled a few feathers when I’ve refused to say a line for a commercial, submitted a suggested rewritten line for a show, or refused commercial opportunities worth a lot of money because they didn’t align with my brand. I know a few people thought I was too righteous or full of myself but at the end of the day, I realized I didn’t need to defend myself but instead, had to go by the feeling I had in my gut. Your gut is a wonderful guide, if it’s tight and constricted, wait on whatever is in front of you. If you feel ease and grace, move forward. You may not understand what’s holding you back but listen to that innate guide that’s been with us since the beginning of time. That sensation doesn’t lie. It sometimes takes a lifetime to be still and feel it but, more times than not, it’s right.

Q: At various points in your life you’ve been faced with significant challenges, including a cancer diagnosis, which have surely tested you emotionally and physically. How have you managed to maintain a gratitude-driven existence and a positive relationship with your body throughout these ups and downs?

Emme: If I didn’t have the hearty body that I have, my cancer and treatments during chemo would have wrecked me. I feel today that cancer was one of my best teachers on so many levels.

However, where I gained the most appreciation for my curvaceous body was when I was pregnant. I absolutely loved being able to carry a child and know I was holding this new life in me. Regardless of the fact that my body gained 70 pounds and I was very large, I felt, without a doubt, that this was what my body was meant to do and I embraced myself at every stage. I even did a photo shoot (with all my bits covered but pretty much nude) and it’s one of my favorite shots.

Q: What is your favorite or most useful piece of advice for individuals who still struggle to find peace with their bodies on a daily basis?

Emme: Develop your list of gratitude and concentrate on that list until the anxiety of not being perfect subsides. This stops me before negative self speak rears it’s angry head. (Granted this sometimes takes years to work, but never giving up breeds success). After repeating this often enough like a trained dog, you come to realize you are much more than the empty shell we call our body. Instead of value being based on shape or size, a person’s true value has a chance to rise and nourish the individual and those around them, shining light on personal character traits like: helpfulness, friendliness, playfulness, bravery, courageousness and so on. Once again, take away the soul and you’ve got nothing, just bones, tendons, muscle and fat.

Q: In addition to your work in the U.S., you’ve been active globally with efforts to help women develop positive relationships with their bodies. Can you tell us more about some of these international efforts?

Emme: I’ve been so blessed to have been given the chance to travel a great deal domestically as well as internationally for my work. As a model I got to represent curvy women on three continents, and today I speak out in national and international press on issues relating to self-acceptance, the tricky issues around body image and how important achieving a healthy balance is to sustainability. Recently I was nominated as a Green Apple Ambassador by the Center for Green Schools, a program of the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) (@mygreenschools).  I’m being asked to co-create a K-12 curriculum with the CGS showing the correlation between the following: positive body image + environment = sustainability. Not only in the confines of the ED community are these issues being worked on but in the corporate world, educational systems, and in architectural environments. What is now being discussed in many professional circles is this: If you don’t feel good about yourself, you will not reach for better, think better, act better, eat better, do better, and ultimately may not care about anything beyond your immediate grasp, thus disconnecting you from the world in which you live. Not a great scenario overall.

So there’s clearly a lot of work to be done in the here and now with children, parents, grandparents, schools and the professional community to take responsibility for what we say, think and do to ourselves, to others and to the environment. And guess what? It boils down to such a simple notion:everything rolls from the source!

Q: Do you think we, as a culture, are making progress moving towards “body peace” instead of body bashing as our norm? What have you noticed?

Emme: We’re certainly speaking more about our bodies in print and online, and women are more reflected ethnically, in more various shapes/sizes and in a wider age range, thankfully. All are very important for our culture to see what exists beyond sterile, digitalized images and corporate projections of beauty. However, the more we seem to make progress and move forward toward diverse representations, the corporate push for a more restrained image pops back in again. So education is key and awareness is paramount. An educated and positively engaged mind, body and spirit can help filter what we see, hear and absorb. Indeed, buyer-be-aware of what we “buy into”. Our dollars can be spent in much better ways and can send a bigger message if we really put our heads together for real change in corporate America. I’ve learned, slow change is lasting change.

Q: Who could benefit from attending your presentation in Baltimore on February 24th? What message or skill do you most hope people will take away with them after hearing your talk?

Emme: I hope to connect with those who want to feel less alone and those seeking answers. No need to suffer in silence or bump along life’s journey by yourself. There’s no right or wrong when seeking out one’s truth. So my only message is this: Come with an open heart, you never know what may inspire, inform or ignite you. There’s only one you, and you are perfect just as you are!

 

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Many thanks to Emme for taking the time to respond to our questions and for sharing her strength and insight with our readers.  If you’d like more information about Emme’s presentation on February 24th, you can visit www.eatingdisorder.org/events or download the event flyer.  The event is free to attend but pre-registration is required to reserve seats.

Interested in more on this topic with Emme?  Join us for a special Twitter Chat with her on Thursday, February 21, 2013 from 1:00-2:00 EST.  Follow @CEDatSheppPratt and @EmmeNation for details and reminders.   

All photos of Emme courtesy of EmmeNation.com

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