THE ILLUSIONISTS Film Screening – Meet the panel of experts…

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On June 7th, hundreds will gather in Baltimore to be among the first to see an exclusive screening of the much-anticipated international documentary The Illusionists. In addition to viewing the full-length film, event attendees will have a unique opportunity to ask questions and converse with a panel of experts including the film’s director.  Meet the panel members below and be sure to reserve your seat for the event.

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Panel Members:

elena_headshotELENA ROSSINI
Writer & Director of ‘The Illusionists’

Elena Rossini is an Italian filmmaker and multimedia producer. Notable film projects include DOVE SEI TU, a feature-length narrative film set in between Milan, the documentary DIRECTION, and IDEAL WOMEN, an experimental short film juxtaposing beauty ideals in the art world vs. mass media, commissioned by ARTE Web and the Louvre Museum. In 2009, Elena launched a multimedia platform – No Country for Young Women – whose aim is to promote the visibility of professional women and to provide real role models for young girls from entrepreneurs to NASA engineers, illustrators, architects, filmmakers, non-profit directors, award-winning novelists, and more.

Since 2011 when The Illusionists was funded through a crowdfunding campaign, Elena has worked tirelessly as writer, producer, cinematographer and director. Elena is also a photographer and a blogger. Her photos and articles have appeared in Jezebel, indieWIRE, Adios Barbie and Gender Across Borders.  Elena will travel from her home in Paris to be a part of this exclusive advance screening and panel discussion.


tmaronickThomas Maronick, JD, DBA
Professor of Marketing
Towson University

Dr. Maronick is a Professor of Marketing in the College of Business and Economics at Towson University in Towson, Maryland.  He holds a BA in Philosophy from St. Thomas Seminary, an MBA from the University of Denver, and a Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA) from the University of Kentucky with a major in Marketing. It also includes a JD from the University of Baltimore, School of Law. Dr. Marnonick is also an inactive member of the Maryland Bar. At Towson University he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in strategic marketing and marketing research and has also taught graduate and executive development courses in marketing, consumer behavior, and marketing research at a number of universities in the Baltimore and Washington DC area. In addition to his role as professor, Dr. Maronick’s professional background includes serving as Director of the Office of Impact Evaluation in the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) from 1980 – 1997 where he served as the in-house marketing expert for all divisions of the Bureau, advising attorneys and senior management on marketing aspects of cases being considered or undertaken by Commission attorneys. Dr. Maronick was also responsible for the evaluation of research submitted by firms being investigated by the Commission and for the design and implementation of all consumer research undertaken by the Bureau during that period. Since leaving the Commission in 1997, Dr. Maronick has served as an expert witness in marketing-related cases and has testified in Federal and State courts.  His areas of expertise include: marketing, deceptive advertising, public policy, research, and expert witness/litigation support.


Laura.Sproch.2015a_portraitLaura Sproch, PhD
Psychologist & Research Coordinator
The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt

Dr. Laura Sproch is a licensed clinical psychologist who serves as the Research Coordinator and outpatient individual, family, and group therapist at the Center for Eating Disorders. Currently, Dr. Sproch is initiating treatment outcome studies, managing quality improvement projects, and developing novel research projects in an effort to contribute to the field’s understanding of effective eating disorder treatment methods. Dr. Sproch received her Ph.D. in Clinical/School Psychology from Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY where she completed her dissertation examining cognitive similarities between differential eating disorder diagnoses. Dr. Sproch originally joined the CED team in 2011 as a postdoctoral fellow on the inpatient and partial hospitalization units acting as a family, individual, and group therapist. She has also worked with adolescents and adults struggling with disordered eating at a variety of levels of care, including at Friends Hospital in Philadelphia, PA and ‘Ai Pono: The Anorexia and Bulimia Center of Hawaii in Honolulu, HI. Her professional interests also include cognitive behavioral therapy, family-based treatment, behavioral modification, and school psychology.


Panel Moderator:

Dr. Crawford headshot_portrait

Steven Crawford, M.D.
The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt

In addition to his leadership role at The Center for Eating Disorders, Dr. Steven Crawford serves as Assistant Chief of Psychiatry at St. Joseph Medical Center, University of Maryland and as an Associate Professor at The University of Maryland where he helps to train medical students on effective screening and care for individuals with eating disorders. As an extension of this commitment to professional training, Dr. Crawford also serves as Director for Eating Disorders fellowship at The Center for Eating Disorders. He is Past President of the Maryland Psychiatric Society and Chair for the Committee on Scientific Activity for MedChi.  Dr. Crawford has participated in numerous research studies including NIMH federally funded research for an international collaborative study on the genetics of Anorexia Nervosa as well as the Family Therapy Treatment of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa. His numerous publications include the chapter on Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders for the fifth edition of Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook. After more than 25 years of specializing in the field of eating disorder treatment, Dr. Crawford has become a trusted resource for his patients, colleagues and the community.

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Questions about the panel or the event?  Call (410) 427-3886 or email




Q&A with Filmmaker, ELENA ROSSINI on “The Illusionists”, why she made the film and her hopes for its impact

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After years of following along with and supporting Elena Rossini’s work to produce The Illusionists, we are thrilled to be able to host the public’s first full sneak peek of the film on June 7 in Baltimore. In advance of the event, we asked Elena about the documentary, the challenges she faced along the way and what’s next for her and the film. Read about her experiences below and be sure to RSVP for the advanced screening and panel discussion.

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Q: “The Illusionists”is a film about the commodification of the body and the spread of westernized beauty ideals. Can you describe those concepts and share a bit about each of the main themes introduced in the film? What was the biggest surprise you encountered while researching the globalization of body ideals?

The central thesis of the film is that after millennia of puritanism, in the 20th century the body was “liberated” – mostly for commercial reasons – and has become “the finest consumer object.” After all, we all have a body and we all go through the process of aging. There is unlimited consumerism built around the idea that a youthful appearance is key to success and happiness. What I found most fascinating is the fact that Western media is so powerful – and persuasive – that it has exported beauty ideals to the rest of the world. So, if you are walking through the streets of Beirut, Mumbai, or Tokyo, you will see billboard ads that display images of Caucasian models with blue eyes, who look very different from the local population. In The Illusionists I show the powerful effects of this globalization of beauty ideals. One of my favorite quotes on the subject comes from British psychotherapist and author Susie Orbach. She says: “I think one of the tragedies that’s happening at the moment is that we’re losing bodies as fast as we’re losing languages. Just as English has become the lingua franca of the world, so the white, blondified, small nosed, pert breast, long-legged body is coming to stand in for the great variety of human bodies that there are.”

Q: What were the biggest barriers for you in getting this project off the ground?

Completing the film truly felt like a Herculean endeavor, as I did virtually everything on my own: from fundraising to writing, producing, directing, shooting and editing. I even took care of archival material and motion graphics – basically covering the roles of a dozen people. It was never my intention to do everything by myself! A famous French director mentored me and proposed to be executive producer: but no French TV networks wanted to give us funding (after 2 years of various meetings), so I was left to do things on my own… and thus started a Kickstarter campaign. When the film was finished and I looked for a celebrity to record the voice-over, some very prominent film people expressed interest in helping… but then disappeared, so I had to resort to finding someone through my own networks. There is an Italian saying that goes “Chi fa da se, fa per tre” – meaning “you’d better do things yourself rather than waiting for someone else to do it.”

In the world of film – which is such a collaborative medium – it’s very difficult to do everything on your own. So, when opportunities for collaboration arose, I was so happy! The audio part of the film – from the incredible soundtrack created by Pierre-Marie Maulini of STAL, to the sound mix done by AOC, to the voice-over recorded by the amazing Peter Coyote… it was truly a dream come true.

Q: What would you say makes “The Illusionists” different from other documentaries about the media portrayal of beauty ideals?

I pinch myself every time I ILLUSIONISTSfilmstillMILAN01have conversations with sales agents who have watched the film, because they invariably compliment The Illusionists for the fact that it has a global angle. Filming locations included the US, UK, Netherlands, Italy, France, Lebanon, India and Japan. This is definitely the film’s biggest selling point and what sets it apart.

From the point of view of storytelling and tone, I wanted to highlight the absurdity of certain advertising messages, so there are many sections of the film where audiences laugh out loud. I have to admit, I am not a big fan of documentaries that simply point the finger in an angry way or show depressing facts for 89 minutes and have a one minute uplifting section at the end, seemingly out of nowhere. I think humour can be a powerful teacher!

Q: What aspects of the film are you most proud of?

My favorite moments are definitely the most shocking and humorous ones. I love to hear audiences react out loud when I show the hypocrisy of beauty companies. One of my favorite sections is a split screen with skin whitening ads on one side, and self-tanning lotions on the other: those are ads by the same brands, but done in different regions of the world!

670-06_Illusionists_FB_twitter_sidebar_4_2015_P2Q: If you had to sum up your film in one word, what would that word be?

Subversive (in a positive way!). A friend has recently called me a “gentle warrior” – it was one of the biggest compliments I ever received. I love the idea of challenging the status quo, but in a way that’s not violent or angry.

Q: What is next for the film, and for you as a Director?  Are you committed to doing more work on body image and media literacy?

I have the utmost admiration for the career of activist, author and filmmaker Jean Kilbourne – whom I was super lucky to feature in The Illusionists. My dream is to follow her footsteps and continue working on The Illusionists, updating the film or doing follow-ups in the years to come. There is so much to talk about and the media landscape is constantly evolving: I’d love to go to new countries and produce a web series that continues to tackle these topics.

Q: What do you hope viewers will get out of attending this special advance screening event on June 7th?

I am so excited about this special advance screening because so far I have only shown the full film to friends, friends-of-friends, or sales agents. I am thrilled at the opportunity to have my first big sneak peek at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt and to see how people who don’t know me will react. A friend said something that stayed with me. Weeks after a private screening at his place, he said, “After watching The Illusionists, I don’t see ads the same way anymore.” I loved hearing that. If I can manage to make audience members more aware of ads and their messages, I would have done my job.


Join us in Baltimore for the exclusive advanced screening of the film followed by a panel discussion with Elena and other experts on body image and media literacy.  Pre-registration is required to reserve seats.

Click the image below to watch a 4-minute preview of The Illusionists

YouTube Preview Image

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It’s Diet Season: Are You Prepared?

girl with unbrella

Diet season is officially upon us.
Weight loss companies are well aware that millions of Americans are actively making New Year’s resolutions. Armed with teams of marketers and millions of dollars, they’ve spent the last twelve months crafting their year-end advertising.  And year after year they are wildly successful, at least in terms of revenue. According to this report, global weight loss markets were expected to be worth $586.3 billion in 2014. The U.S. is the largest contributor to that figure and was projected to reach $310 billion last year.

Yes, the weight loss industry has been preparing for an entire year. But, you can be prepared too. The first step is anticipating the messages that you will be bombarded with so you’re not caught off guard. Here are just a few of the diet industry’s strategies you are sure to encounter in the new year:

  • They will make a lot of promises for a “better” you, a “more successful” you, a “happier” you, but most emphatically, a “thinner” you. They will use those terms interchangeably to try to convince you that you cannot be better, happier or more successful without weight loss. You can.
  • They will pay celebrities enormous amounts of money to endorse what they are selling. Average salaries for celebrity weight-loss endorsers range from $500,000 to $3 million via ABC News.
  • They will tell you this time will be different.
  • They will make faulty connections between weight and health.
  • They will use scare tactics and personal stories to appeal to your emotions.
  • They will use before and after pictures that may or may not be the same person, are often retouched and photoshopped, or might just be stock images of someone who never used their product.
  • They will try to convince you that your body cannot be trusted to do one of it’s most basic jobs.  They will insist you need to pay them money to rely on external rules or charts for when and how much to eat.
  • They will ignore the natural and healthy diversity of bodies by telling you everyone can be thin if they work hard enough. This also happens to be one of the four toxic myths that promote most body image and weight concerns. This cycle works very well for diet companies because the more concerned people are with their bodies, the more likely they are to engage in weight control behaviors. In other words, it is in their best interest to keep you dissatisfied with your body so that you keep buying their product and it keeps being ineffective.
  • They will share short-term statistics from studies funded by their own investors to show how well their diet plan works for the first 3-6 months. They will not respond to requests for independent, long-term outcome studies.
  • They may tell you their product is “not a diet but a lifestyle”.
  • They will tell you your health is at risk. They will not tell you about studies like this which found the risk of mortality was higher among people in the underweight category than it was for those in the overweight category OR like this one which showed increased health behaviors led to improved health markers even in the absence of weight loss.
  • They may even include the phrase “results not typical” in fine print at the very bottom of their full page ad or in speedy verbal disclaimers at the end of a commercial.
  • It is only January yet still, they will tell you that summer is just around the corner and then attempt to make the case that your body is not “ready” for the beach. Spoiler Alert: If you have a body and you have the chance to go to a beach, then you are ready.
  • Are we missing anything? Can you think of other trends or predictable marketing slogans used by the diet industry to try to sell their products? You can add to the list on our Facebook page.

Why is it important to be prepared?
The National Eating Disorder Association reports that 35% of “normal dieters” progress to pathological dieting, and 20-25% of those individuals will develop eating disorders. This is not because eating disorders are simply “diets gone too far” but because diets trigger biological, emotional and mental shifts in the way you process food and information about that food. It is well established that diets can…

  • Dysregulate and weaken your body’s natural cues for hunger and fullness.
  • Trigger obsessive thoughts about food and weight
  • Cause intense cravings for off-limit foods
  • Create anxiety about certain types of food and in response to specific situations involving food such as eating with other people or in public places when the diet-safe food is unavailable.
  • Establish a pattern of failure, low self-esteem and distrust of one’s body
  • Assign moral judgment to foods
  • Develop a system in which exercise is used as a form of punishment instead of a fun or social activity

Clinging to the diet mentality or getting caught up in weight cycling is futile, not to mention potentially harmful to your health and your wallet. For individuals at risk for eating disorders, or for those in recovery, these dieting side effects can be even more dangerous and may create risk for relapse. This year, don’t let the diet season bring you down. Be prepared to stand up against diet pressures by knowing exactly what to expect.  If you find yourself getting overwhelmed or tempted by the ads this season, print out the list above and try checking off all of the marketing tactics you notice.  Then choose to move towards nourishment, self-care and non-judgment by inviting a body-positive friend to lunch, scheduling a massage, setting the table for a mindful eating experience or reaching out for extra support from a treatment provider.

Other Helpful Resources:

  1. Mindful Eating on Campus: Parts 1 & 2
  2. The Resolution Solution
  3. A Message for People Considering Their Next Diet (pdf) from Linda Bacon, PhD
  4. Ringing in the New Year in a New Way
  5. What is Intuitive Eating?

Join CED on Facebook for body image inspiration and recovery support.

*Above image courtesy of and a454

This Week in #MediaLiteracy | 2 Campaigns You Should Know About

The world of social media presents an interesting dichotomy.  The challenges of existing in an online community are ever increasing.  Concerns about safety and security are high on the list of course (particularly for parents with tech savvy kids) but additional risks to overall well-being and self-esteem are lingering close behind.  Dangers include online bullying, exposure to harmful imagery or media, and the less sensationalized, yet still problematic, body bashing and body comparison often experienced within sites like Facebook and Pinterest.

Yet while these risks exist, these same online communities also provide a great opportunity for social change and grassroots organizing.  We’ve seen two such examples of powerful social media campaigns this week that we thought were worth sharing.  If you struggle with the body toxic environment online OR offline, perhaps these are opportunities for you to help create change for yourself and for others.   Take a look, find out more, get involved.  Just think, every minute you spend advocating for media literacy, body positivity and truth is one less minute you have to engage in the alternatives.


The Truth in Advertising Act of 2014 (HR4341) was introduced earlier this week with bipartisan support from Representatives in Florida and California and with collaboration from several great organizations including The Eating Disorders Coalition and The Brave Girls Alliance.

The groundbreaking bill calls on the Federal Trade Commission to develop a legislative framework for advertisements that alter the human body (i.e. shape, size, proportion, color, etc.) and asks for recommendations and remedies for photoshopped ads that are determined to be false/deceptive and which may contribute to a series of emotional, psychological and physical health issues, and economic consequences – particularly affecting, but not limited to, girls and women.” (via Brave Girls Alliance).  If this is something you support, its easy to get involved in any of the following ways:

  • Add your name to the petition by Seth Matlins
  • Read this great write-up about the Truth in Advertising Act by Matt Wetsel over at his blog, …Until Eating Disorders are No More.  He makes it easy to  find your representative in Congress and how to let them know you support the bill.
  • Take to Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and any other social media site with the hastag #TruthInAds to help spread the word. You can even stop by The Brave Girls Alliance for toolkits, images and talking points for the campaign.


The Illusionists is a 90 minute documentary about the body as the “finest consumer object” and the pursuit of ideal beauty around the world. Or: how corporations are getting richer by making us feel insecure about the way we look. 

The hard thing for most people about speaking out against society’s narrow ideals of beauty is that it can feel like you’re a fish swimming upstream in a strong current of Photoshopped bodies, fat talk, and dieting.  Taking a stand can mean you’re up against some pretty powerful forces like the beauty and fashion industries, the diet and weight loss industries and even the larger television and film media that rely on funding from these sources. This pressure compounds when you’re an independent filmmaker working to expose the stories and financial benefits behind the WORLD’S beauty ideals.  That’s what filmmaker, Elena Rossini is doing with her documentary The Illusionists and it’s why The Center for Eating Disorders has been a supporter of the film since it first launched via a Kickstarter campaign in 2011.

Now that the film is almost complete, Elena is swimming against that cultural current once more, and has taken to Twitter with the #AdoptTheIllusionists campaign to help the film, and its message, get the widest possible circulation. On her blog, Elena writes, “My passion for the project stems from its potential to incite activism: I strongly believe that The Illusionists can ignite important conversations about consumer culture, mass media, and the epidemic of body image dissatisfaction around the world. It only takes one person to believe in The Illusionists for the fate of the film to change. It could be a producer. An actress. A writer. An activist with the right connections. It could be you.”

The film has already caught the eye of accomplished artists and activists including Geena Davis and Stephen Fry.  If YOU want to see the first 4 minutes of the film and then show your support for the film, visit Elena’s post, It Only Takes One Person or go straight to the #AdoptTheIllusionists campaign page for supportive statements that are ready-to-tweet.

Let us know how you’ve supported the above campaigns and other ways you engage in media literacy activism.  Leave a comment below or join us on Facebook and Twitter.

Photoshop Does Not Cause Eating Disorders – Media & Body Image

Media Literacy Infographic

Click to View (pdf)

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week
(Feb. 23 – March 1, 2014)

Did you know that photoshopped bodies and the unrealistic beauty ideals set forth by the media DO NOT cause eating disorders?  While these unfortunate elements of our society CAN contribute to widespread negative body image and promote an internalization of the “thin ideal”, they cannot be blamed outright for the development of the serious and complex illnesses such as anorexia, bulimia,  binge eating disorder and EDNOS or OSFED.

When it comes to Eating Disorders there are actually a variety of contributing factors, of which the strongest are likely to be genetics and biology. In fact, research suggests 50-80% of a person’s risk for developing an eating disorder is due to genetics which includes factors associated with heritable personality traits such as perfectionism.

That being said, some studies have documented a link between exposure to westernized, thin-ideal media and an increase in eating disorder behaviors.   So while Photoshop may not cause eating disorders outright, the bottom line is that we all stand to benefit from more positive and realistic bodies in the media.  After all, individuals who feel better about their bodies take better care of them, regardless of weight, shape or size. Plus, positive body image and media literacy CAN serve as protective factors against disordered eating which is one reason why The Center for Eating Disorders supports projects like the Love Your Tree Campaign and The Illusionists documentary.

The infographic above from the National Eating Disorders Association breaks down some of the important elements of the media’s effects on body image. Click on the image to open and join the conversation on our Facebook page.

Read more about the etiology of eating disorders here: Underlying Causes and Contributing Factors

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I Had No Idea…Males and Eating Disorders – National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2014

This helpful infographic from The National Eating Disorders Association helps to break down some of the key facts. Spread the word and help others by breaking down stereotypes and supporting accurate information about  males and eating disorders.  Join us on Facebook for more information and to join the #NEDAWeek conversation.

Infographic: Males & Eating DisordersThe Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt has been treating males affected by eating disorders for over twenty years yet barriers remain for those seeking treatment.  Cultural stigma regarding males and eating disorders can make it more difficult for men to come forward and seek treatment on their own. The good news is that education, support and awareness about eating disorders among males are all improving so that more boys and men are seeking and receiving the treatment they need and deserve.

Integrating Art & Body Image in the 8th Annual Love Your Tree Campaign

The President’s Committee on Arts & Humanities released a report in 2011 entitled Reinvesting in Arts Education. The report included a long list of evidence to support the benefits of integrating art throughout various disciplines in schools by “teaching ‘through’ and ‘with’ the arts”.  These benefits included fewer discipline problems, increased graduation rates, and improved test scores.  Even more interesting, using artistic mediums to teach, led to more interest in the subject matter, increased motivation to learn the topic at hand, and even the “advantage of embedding knowledge in long-term memory”.  Simply put, art not only makes things more fun and enjoyable to learn, it helps the brain to convert information in deeper, more meaningful ways that we remember longer.

While the President’s report encourages schools to use these benefits to improve learning in subject areas such as science, math and language arts, there are great  implications for learning other things – like positive body image and media literacy.  These are the goals of The Center for Eating Disorders’ Love Your Tree Campaign.  Now in its 8th year, Love Your Tree is arts-based campaign open to middle school, high school and college-aged youth, many of whom subscribe very strongly to our culture’s “thin ideal”.

“Thin-ideal internalization refers to the extent to which an individual cognitively “buys into” socially defined ideals of attractiveness and engages in behaviors designed to produce an approximation of these ideals.” (source)

Love Your Tree utilizes the creative poster-making process, media literacy skills and cognitive dissonance theory to help students internalize new ideals that support body diversity and self-acceptance.  Based on the President’s Report, using art as the educational tool helps to convey this knowledge in an effective, enjoyable way.  It also means that positive changes in body image that take place throughout participation in the campaign are more likely to be long-lasting.  Why is this important?  A positive body image is associated with higher levels of self-esteem overall and can serve as a protective factor against the development of eating disorders.

The 8th Annual Love Your Tree (LYT) campaign launches officially on July 12th.  Visit the LYT website to find out how your school or community organization can get involved and schedule a Love Your Tree workshop.

Questions?  Call (410) 427-3886

*Love Your Tree posters from past years will be on display in a traveling exhibit on August 25th through September 2nd, 2013 at The Shops at Kenilworth in Towson, MD.  We invite you to stop by to view the artwork and get more information about the campaign.





The 7th annual Love Your Tree campaign ~ Promoting positive body image and self-acceptance through art

“Like a tree, my body is ENDURING.”

2012 Artwork by Meghan Cain, Notre Dame Preparatory School

WHAT is Love Your Tree?

Love Your Tree is an arts-based body image campaign based on the work of author and activist, Eve Ensler.  Ensler’s award winning play, The Good Body sends a message to stop hating our bodies and encourages us all to challenge society’s narrow definition of beauty. The Love Your Tree program was created seven years ago as a creative avenue for this important message to reach young people in schools and organizations throughout our state and beyond. Middle school, high school and college students from across Maryland are invited to create and submit original posters that illustrate their positive response to the phrase, “Like a tree, my body is…”. This campaign provides students with an opportunity to use art as an avenue for learning about and expressing messages of self-acceptance and appreciation for body diversity.  Center for Eating Disorders staff are available to provide free, on-site Love Your Tree workshops for schools and youth organizations wanting to take part in the campaign.


Love Your Tree workshops are offered to schools, clubs, and youth organizations August through December of 2012.  Call (410) 427-3886 or email to schedule.  Poster entries must be submitted by December 14th, 2012.

August 9-12, 2012 : Join us for a community Love Your Tree exhibit to highlight the campaign at The Shops at Kenilworth in Towson, Maryland…read more here.


Middle School, High School and College-age students throughout Maryland can participate.  One poster per person.  Educators, counselors, youth leaders and parents are encouraged to help facilitate participation in the campaign.


Schedule a workshop and/or download the following documents for details on how to submit a poster:

  • 2012 Call-for-Posters (pdf)
  • Student Artwork Registration Form (pdf) - must be handed in with artwork
  • All artwork MUST reflect original student ideas and designs.
  • Poster entries must be no smaller than 9″x12″ and no larger than 12″x18″.  Only two- dimensional media will be accepted. Please be sure your name is on the registration for and the artwork itself.
  • For more information, contact the CED Outreach Department at (410) 427-3886 or email


The campaign will culminate in February 2013 with a special recognition ceremony and a public exhibit of student artwork.  Students will receive awards for their artwork and one poster will be chosen for professional reproduction and promotion of the Love Your Tree message.  You can check out photos of past exhibits and receptions  on our Facebook page.

The campaign’s central theme, Love Your Body, Love Your Tree encourages self-awareness, media literacy, health and well-being, advocacy and an appreciation for the diversity of beauty.

Nurturing a Positive Pregnancy…Lessons Learned from Eating Disorder Recovery

Several months ago, The Center for Eating Disorders had the pleasure of hosting former World Champion rower, Whitney Post, as a keynote speaker during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.  In her talk, Invisible Victory, she spoke about her identity as an elite athlete and how she ultimately used it to her advantage in recovering from her eating disorder (ED).  During her visit to Baltimore, Whitney also shared that she was expecting a baby this June, and that  her work in ED recovery had provided a unique perspective and helpful skills for navigating the ups, downs and body image challenges of pregnancy.  In honor of Mother’s Day,  we asked Whitney if she would help us re-introduce our Nurture blog series for moms and mothers-to-be, and she graciously agreed.  The result is this insightful and delightfully down-to-earth Q&A  post about her ongoing journey through pregnancy and recovery. 

 Q & A with Whitney Post

Q: Have you noticed any similarities or parallels between the pregnancy experience and the recovery process?

WP: I remember early on in pregnancy lying in bed and trying to take stock of all the changes that were going on in my work, my body, my energy, and my identity.  It felt overwhelming to say the least, but what occurred to me was that I was so glad I had all the training of recovery to help me navigate this new journey.  I already knew how to surrender large areas of my life for the sake of something new and different.  I think both recovery and pregnancy are about building new life.  In each the process is long, full of uncertainty and discomfort, and full of hope.  There is a great demand for outside support and people who have been through the process before, and the ability to surrender to what the process is asking of you vs. having things exactly the way you want them.

Q: Can you describe how the process of recovering from an ED has helped you prepare for the experience of pregnancy, particularly as it relates to your body image?

WP: I wanted to be one of those women who remained toned and just grew a big round belly out front.  I am not.  I wanted to be one of those women who stayed true to her satisfying workout regimes.  I am not.  And I wanted to be one of those women who seemed to get more stylish as her belly grew, with cool accessories and funky outfits.  I am not. 

But what I am is one of those women who is putting the health of the child growing inside me first, and doing my best with all the rest.  I just do it while wearing clogs, and in between very moderate (“lame” would be another term) workouts.  As the weight started to come on, I could feel two sides of my brain at work.  One said, “this is a miracle and weight gain is part of the process.  This is healthy and natural.”  Meanwhile, another, old part of my brain shouted, “Hello!!!! You are gaining weight!!  Remember how unhappy you were last time this happened?  Do something about it now!!!”  Every time another round of clothes has to be retired because it becomes snug, a part of me feels an old tug to feel bad about myself.  But recovery taught me the skills of being able to recognize these two different voices and gave me the ability to make a choice, vs. listening to whichever voice is scarier.  I am pleased to say that, “this is normal and natural” now wins easily over “go on a diet!”

At my OB office when they check you in for each visit they hand you a cup to pee in and ask you to weigh yourself.  They leave the room and come back in about ten minutes.  For several months I would worry about having to weigh myself, as part of my recovery has involved not knowing how much I weigh.  I could have asked them to weigh me and just looked away, that would have been totally valid, but I just chose to do the drill and let them decide if I was gaining too much or too little.  As long as I’m not trying to control my weight, but rather trust that to the doctors, and manage healthy meals and appropriate workouts, I feel I am on track.

Q: How can pregnancy positively or negatively impact recovery? 

WP: I have found that I have had to work pretty hard at taking care of my recovery because my needs changed suddenly.  I had to find a new way to eat when everything made me nauseated.  I had to find a new way to work the tools of the program when I was too tired to go to 12-step meetings I normally went to.  I had to find women who were in recovery who had been pregnant to learn from them.  So suddenly, the little world of my recovery resources needed to be updated and shifted, and that has been a big investment on my part.  So I think if you let the things that sustain you in recovery slide because you have less energy or those resources don’t fit as well, you can be on a slippery slope, because you may also find yourself (as I often have) more emotionally vulnerable than normal.  But if you look at it as a time to invest in a new phase of recovery and build a community around you, it can strengthen you.

Q: Can you share some concrete steps women can take during pregnancy to help them nurture a positive relationship with their changing bodies?

  • Recognize you may have conflicting feelings and impulses but make sure your actions reflect your goals and values.  (for example – I want to diet because I don’t like gaining weight but my goal is to have a healthy baby and pregnancy, and so I will accept that gaining weight is part of the process and is temporary).
  • Talk to other women who have been through it and speak honestly about your experience.  You can be a wonderful mother and still not enjoy every aspect of pregnancy – they are not mutually exclusive.
  • Ensure from the outset that you have an OB who is supportive of prioritizing health vs. weight.  Then, trust your doctors when it comes to monitoring weight, exercise, etc., and get someone (nutritionist or physician) to work with you on the food and eating part, if you struggle with it, so you aren’t alone.
  • Focus on the positive parts – go to birthing classes, pay attention to the baby kicks, pick out baby clothes, prepare the house, etc.
  • Go with your body’s intuition about when it needs a rest, a snack or a cry.  You may not be able to keep up with your old self, or your old standards, and that’s okay.  It’s important to accept that your body now has a whole new task to prioritize; supporting the physical growth and development of your baby requires a lot of energy.

Q: As an eating disorder treatment professional, a recovery advocate and now a pregnant woman yourself, what are your thoughts on the mainstream media’s representation of pregnant and post-pregnancy bodies? 

WP: Mainstream media has never been helpful when it comes to figuring out how my body should look, and a pregnant body is no different.  The women chosen to be pregnancy models or on the covers of magazines are a very select group of pregnant women who all look much the same, and are all captured in about their fifth or sixth month of pregnancy when the belly is often cute and round.  If you go to a prenatal yoga class and look at all the bodies (as I often did – I was barely able to focus on the poses) you will see all the different shapes and sizes of bellies regardless of the phase of pregnancy.  Some of them seem pretty wacky looking as we are just not accustomed to seeing really pregnant women!  I find it much healthier to see these real live pregnant women than to look at the models.

As for “after the baby” the media is obsessed with how fast a woman can “get her body back.”  I’m happy Heidi Klum made it her goal to be a sexy Victoria secret model within weeks of giving birth, but I don’t think that is helpful for most women.  I am really looking forward to being able to run and do a sit up and move my body with greater ease and speed after the baby is born.  But the reality is I will be sleep deprived and in a very demanding phase of feeding, soothing, and getting to know a new baby, and at that time, I don’t need to be preoccupied with how quickly I can lose weight.  Focusing on eating well and getting in some sleep and exercise will be my goal for good self-care.

Q: Is there one piece of advice that has been particularly helpful for you in terms of staying focused on wellness and body positivity during pregnancy?

WP: Trust your body and stay connected ~ not that different from recovery, right? : )  Pregnancy can make you tired and moody, and both of those things can make socializing less appealing. I have found that I need to push myself to stay connected to old pals and to reach out to start to create a new community of moms-to-be. 

Q: Are there any lessons you’ve learned through ED recovery that you think may also be helpful for individuals as they venture into the day-to-day life of motherhood with a new baby?

WP:In recovery I spent a lot of time learning how to figure out what I needed, and how to stand up for that need while being kind and respectful of others.  But I still need to fight a part of me that is stuck in the habit of  “people pleasing.”  In pregnancy part of my job is to avoid putting myself in bad situations (being around people who have contagious colds or flus, overdoing myself with social/work demands), even though I might have been fine with these situations when not pregnant. This means I have to say “no” to things more often.  I learned early on that if I went against an instinct about my limits of comfort, I was really uncomfortable. I imagine some of the same will be true with an infant.  So my lesson that I am learning over again is that I need to respect my instincts and boundaries, and while I may inconvenience people in the process, we will all survive.

Whitney Post is the President and Co-Founder of Eating for Life Alliance and spends much of her time educating college students, professionals, athletes and coaches about eating disorder prevention and treatment. The Center for Eating Disorders is incredibly grateful to Whitney for sharing her insights, experiences,  and advice about pregnancy and recovery for this post We wish her well as she ventures into motherhood!  If you’d like to share your own ideas on this topic, please leave your thoughts in the comments section below or join the discussion on our Facebook Page

If you enjoyed this blog, you may want to read these previous entries from CED’s Nurture Blog Series:

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*Significant health risks (for mom and baby) are associated with eating disorders during pregnancy.  It is recommended that the eating disorder be significantly resolved before a pregnancy is attempted.  If pregnancy does occur prior to recovery, it is imperative that you receive appropriate medical and psychological support. If you are struggling with an eating disorder during pregnancy, or are working hard to maintain your recovery during pregnancy, we would like to remind you how important it is to be honest with your OB and other medical providers during this time.  It’s critical that your providers are aware of your medical history and any current and past ED symptoms so that they can provide the best possible health care for you and your baby.  

What’s Really Going On with Facebook & Body Image?

The results of our recent survey regarding the intersection of Facebook use and body image have been highlighted by various news outlets over the past two weeks.  We discussed the implications of the survey results here (and as a guest post over at The Illusionists), drawing attention to the fact that 51% of the 600 survey respondents said they often compare themselves to others while on Facebook and that seeing photos on Facebook makes them more self-conscious about their own body and weight.  Additionally, 32% endorsed feelings of sadness when they compare their body to other people’s photos on Facebook which, for most people, is at least once a day if not more.

Facebook: Body Image Friend or Foe? at The

We originally set out to do this survey because we were finding that patients with eating disorders were meeting with great difficulty in the recovery process when it came to logging into their Facebook accounts.  In fact, before we released the full survey results, one user on our Facebook page left the following comment:

Facebook definitely played a role in fueling my eating disorder symptoms and behaviors.  Most people only post pictures that glamorize their bodies and social life…There have been multiple times throughout my recovery that I have deactivated my account because the things I was seeing online were fogging my view of reality.  Realizing that the site was doing more harm than good for me has made me more aware of the things I post on my account.  I think it’s important to make sure we are trying to foster a safe and healthy community and we can only do that if we first change the way we act… .” -  Facebook User

While some media outlets have gone as far as to say that Facebook is a cause of negative body image and eating disorders, others have dismissed the significance of the results as par for the course in our  image and weight-obsessed culture.  Others, including this editorial assistant over at Allure Magazineonline, have spoken up in a personal, and humorous, way about the modern realities of  this pressure-to-be-perfect in Facebook photos. Despite the varied reactions, one thing became clear to us following the survey;   Individuals with eating disorders are not alone in their battle with body-obsession on Facebook.   

Since the survey, we’ve been asked multiple times about how body-pressure from online social media differs from the toxic messages we’ve been getting for decades from fashion magazines, commercials and weight-focused friends?   The answer: the content itself is nothing new to us as a society - conversations that are hyper-focused on weight loss, diets, bikini bodies, and who looks “hot or not” – but the delivery and dissemination of it is new.  We’ve noticed the following characteristics of online communities are unique in how they can potentially affect the relationship we have with our bodies: 

  • Accessibility - Online social networks never turn off.  Even when you’re by yourself you’re often not far from your laptop, iPad or Smartphone and the lure of logging in to Facebook.  In the past, waiting in line at the store might have included…waiting in line.  With a smartphone it could easily be spent browsing Facebook pics from your old college roomate’s beach vacation or reading about Aunt Sally’s 37th time going on a diet.  For better or worse, we have a lot more visual information at our fingertips than ever before. 
  • Immediacy – your status update or photo can literally be seen (and commented on) around the world in a matter of seconds.
  • Lack of control over what other people post and how people comment on it.
  • Two-way street- unlike with magazines or commercials, Facebook not only allows you to see photos of other people, but allows them to see photos of you.  Maybe even more importantly, YOU are seeing public photos of you which can sometimes create the most body anxiety, especially if your instinct is to zero in on all of your supposed “imperfections” in each picture.
  • Business or Pleasure? – there’s a unique mix between the personal and business realms on Facebook.  Users often use one account to stay connected with friends/family but also occasionally promote a product or business in their posts and photos.  This means we get advertisement-like messages about beauty, exercise and weight-loss products from people we like and/or trust.  Confusing? Definitely.     
  • The sheer number of people you are connected to on Facebook is more than you would ever casually socialize with on a Friday night. The thought of hundreds or even thousands of people zeroing in on what you imagine to be “imperfections” can be overwhelming when it comes to body insecurities.  (It’s important to remember that no one else is ever looking at you or your body in photos as closely as you are!) 
  • Body Comparisons while on Facebook take on new meaning because you’re seeing real people.  Unlike magazines and advertisements which feature [heavily photoshopped]models and celebrities, photos of Facebook friends may, unfortunately, feel like a more realistic or welcoming comparison.  

The truth is, when you get caught up in comparing yourself and your body to other people (online or off) you can’t win.  Blogger, Margarita Tartakovsky, shares her journey out of this comparison trap in How To Stop Comparing Yourself To Others, in which she reflects:  

When you’re rarely satisfied with yourself, your self-worth is shaky, and you see others’ lives as almost perfect – or definitely better than your own. You  constantly search outside yourself, and as a result, you knock yourself down. For many of us, comparing ourselves just changes stripes from time to time. One day, we want someone else’s abs, biceps or hips. Another day, we want their smarts or style. A few days later, we want their family life or financial situation.  Until we can truly believe in ourselves, the comparisons will swirl and sabotage…It’s interesting that now that I accept, appreciate and believe in my body, the physical comparisons have mostly quieted.

The trap of body negativity and comparisons on Facebook can certainly be difficult to avoid, especially if your online social atmosphere includes a lot of people who place a high value on appearance-only qualities or happen to be caught up in the diet mentality themselves.  The impact can feel much more powerful if your body image is already in a fragile state as is often the case for individuals with eating disorders and those recovering from eating disorders.  

The great news is that you can mold a more positive online experience for yourself.  If you’ve reflected on your Facebook use,  assessed its impact on your body image and realized that too much of your social networking time is spent feeling worried or sad about how you look, than it may be time to set some changes in motion.

You can start by vowing to maintain a body positive Facebook profile - this means not engaging in fat talk, self-criticism, diet discussion or body snarking while on Facebook. Once you’ve made the decision to do so, you can find tips and suggestions for incorporating body positivity in our post, Social Networks ~ Building a Body Positive Presence Online.

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