The Center for Eating Disorders Blog

New Collaborative Care Programs for parents, caregivers and loved ones

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt has long urged the participation and inclusion of family members in the treatment process for both adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.  In addition to all of our family treatment components, parents and family members have been able to access our community support group as well as a weekly family psychoeducation group.  We are excited to announce that, beginning in July 2012, family members and caregivers of our patients will be provided with an additional level of support and engagement in the recovery process.

The Collaborative Care Workshops are designed to help provide education and support for the friends and family members who are most central to the patient’s recovery process.

Building from the strengths of the family based model, Janet Treasure and her colleagues have developed a series of workshops for caregivers of loved ones who have been diagnosed with eating disorders as a way of meeting the needs of the carers.  The workshops are designed to educate carers on the key skills that clinicians have in treating eating disorders so that there is more continuity in care between the treatment setting and at home. The workshops are designed to address the most universal needs of the carers: connection with other carers; support; and skills training. Sessions reflect an adult learning modality in which skills are taught and then there is ample time for participants to practice these skills experientially. Key skills taught include motivational interviewing, communication, the trans-theoretical model of change, self-care and behavior analysis. Research suggests that participation in these workshops, leads to benefits for both the carers and the patient. (Treasure, Sepulveda, Whitaker, Todd and Lopez).

 ~ Outpatient Collaborative Care Workshops at CED ~

The 6-week Collaborative Care workshop series will be offered to parents, significant others and primary caregivers of individuals who are stepping down from our higher levels of care (inpatient or partial hospital programs). Typically, participation in the workshop series will begin the week following a loved one’s discharge from the eating disorder unit.  [UPDATE: As of July 2013, CC Workshops are open to all family members and support people during any stage of a loved one’s treatment and recovery.] Participation in the program will provide caregivers with the following resources, skills and opportunities:

  1. Provide basic eating disorder education, including current research findings about treatment recommendations, course of illness and treatment, prognosis, and basic understanding of how eating disorders are maintained.
  2. Define and recognize symptom substitution behaviors and strategies for managing these should they arise.
  3. Analyze carer needs and learning to implement self-care strategies, including mindfulness techniques.
  4. Learn effective communication skills to improve communication with their loved one who has an eating disorder.
  5. Recognize caregiver styles and learning to maximize strengths while working towards the most effective caregiver style.
  6. Define the different stages of change in the trans-theoretical model of change and understand how these stages can impact a loved one’s motivation throughout the treatment process.
  7. Learn how to help increase their loved one’s motivation towards recovery.
  8. Improve emotional intelligence by learning basic emotion regulation skills.
  9. Learn the basic theoretical model of cognitive behavioral therapy, as well as basic CBT techniques.
  10. Learn how to analyze how caregiver behaviors may inadvertently contribute to the maintenance of eating disorder behaviors in the family context.

Additionally, caregivers will learn about the interventions most commonly used by the Center for Eating Disorders.  Providing carers with education on the basic theoretical underpinnings of cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy will ensure that carers understand the skills that their loved ones have been taught in treatment. This will allow carers to be more fully able to support their loved one in attempts to challenge and/or block eating disorder cognitions and behaviors when they are at home. For more information about this program please email the Collaborative Care group facilitator, jmoran@sheppardpratt.org.

The Center for Eating Disorders has also added a 4-weekend Collaborative Care workshop series exclusively for family members  of current CED inpatients and partial hospital patients.  Please call us at (410) 938-5252 for more information.

Visit our website: www.eatingdisorder.org

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 References & Additional Resources:

Lock, J; Couturier, J; and Agras, W.S. (2006)Comparison of long-term outcomes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa treated with family therapy. Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(6), 66-72.

Lock, J.; Le Grange, D.; Agras, W.S. and Dare, C. (2001) Treatment Manual for Anorexia Nervosa: A Family Based Approach. New York: Guilford.

Silverman, J. Anorexia Nervosa: Historical Perspective on Treament (1997). In D.M. Garner & P.E. Garfinkel (Eds), Handbook of treatment for eating disorders, 2nd edition(pp 3-10) New York: Guilford Press.

Treasure, J., Schmidt, U. & Macdonald, P. (Eds). (2010) The Clinician’s Guide to Collaborative Caring in Eating Disorders: The New Maudsley Method. New York: Routledge.

Treasure, J., Sepulveda, A., Whitaker, W., Todd, G. & Lopez, C. (2010) Family and Carer workshops. In Treasure, J., Schmidt, U. & Macdonald, P. (Eds). (2010) The Clinician’s Guide to Collaborative Caring in Eating Disorders: The New Maudsley Method.(pp167-173) New York: Routledge.

Treasure, J.; Smith, G.; and Crane. A. (2007) Skills-based learning for caring for a loved one with an eating disorder: The new Maudsley method. New York: Routledge.

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